EVENT SCHEDULE

Thursday, July 27, 2017

PLEASE NOTE:  This is an estimated schedule only.  Events and activities are subject to change. 

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.     MEETING SITE: The Orvis Company Flagship Store in Manchester, Vermont.  The address is 4180 Main St, Manchester, VT 05254.  The Muddy Chef Staff will greet you at Orvis! From there you will leave for your off-road adventure and arrive at the Muddy Chef Campsite and HQ.

5:00 p.m.        Adventure Gates close. Course sweep and clearing.

5:30 p.m.        Non-Adventure registration opens at campsite.

6:00 p.m.        Vendor Village opens. Vendor presentations, tech sessions, etc.

6:30 p.m.        Arkonik presentation.

7:30 p.m.        13th Street Cocktails opens!

8:00 p.m.       Non-adventure challenge registration closes. No more admissions to the campsite until following morning.

11:00 p.m.      Quiet hours.

Friday, July 28, 2017

9:00 a.m. –  1:00 p.m.    Late registration arrivals at the Orvis Company Flagship Store in Manchester, Vermont.  The address is 4180 Main St, Manchester, VT 05254.  The Muddy Chef Staff will greet you at Orvis! From there you will leave for your off-road adventure and arrive at the Muddy Chef Campsite and HQ.

9:30 a.m.       Safety meeting in the main tent.

10:00 a.m.     Departures for off-site activities:

Off-Road

Falconry

Shooting

Fly Fishing

Outlet Shopping

10:30 a.m.     Off-Road presentations and instruction in the main tent.

11:00 a.m.      Multi-Track Activities:

Test drives in Arkonik Defenders.

Off-Road driving at campsite.

12:00 p.m.     Lunch on your own.

2:00 p.m.       Return to campsite to prepare for fancy dress cocktail party and Chopped cooking challenge.

3:00 p.m.       Depart for the offsite party and Chopped Challenge.

4:00 p.m.       Arrive at EVENT SITE – TBA

5:00 p.m.       Chopped Challenge begins.

6:00 p.m.       All meals must be turned in for judging.

6:30 p.m.       Judging complete. Trophy and prize awards.

7:00 p.m.       Return to campsite.

7:30 p.m.       Target shooting competition with Airguns of Arizona

7:30 p.m.       13th Street Cocktails opens.

11:00 p.m.     Quiet hours.

Saturday, July 29, 2017

9:30 a.m.       Safety meeting in the main tent.

10:00 a.m.    Guided off-road adventures:    

Green with Brad, Eric and Max (light off-road and overlanding)

Blue with Peter and Peter (more challenging off-roading)

Black with Chris, Gene, and Logan (challenging off-roading)

10:30 a.m.     Unguided departures:

Falconry

Bromley Mountain Adventure Center

Fly Fishing

Vermont Country Store via overland

12:00 p.m.    Lunch on your own.

4:00 p.m.      Return to the campsite.

4:30 p.m.      Judges meeting.

5:00 p.m.      Muddy Chef Challenge begins:

5:00 p.m.      Appetizer preparation.

5:30 p.m.      Appetizer judging.

6:00 p.m.      Main course preparation.

7:00 p.m.      Main course judging.

7:30 p.m.      Dessert course preparation.

8:00 p.m.      Dessert judging.

9:00 p.m.      13th Street Cocktails Celebration (Sponsored by Tito’s Handmade Vodka)

Sunday, July 30, 2017

10:00 a.m.    Muddy Chef Challenge prizes and awards. Also assorted prizes and awards.

12:00 p.m.    Campsite closes – SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!

LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF SPONSOR LIST 2017

2016 Judging Revisions

2016 Muddy Chef Challenge Judging Revisions

Housewife cooking on the kitchen with big fire

To put it mildly, the judging at the MCC4 was “challenging”.  Too many judges, judges that wandered off during the contest and my personal favorite – a smartphone app that we tested extensively prior to the event, stopped working half way though the judging.

It seemed that every time we tried to correct the course of the judging we encountered more and more problems.

So, to that end we are implementing the following changes in advance of the event.  We believe these changes will address the majority of issues. As always, your comments and ideas are welcome.

Judges Routes through the Campsite during the MCC:

The judges will follow a pre-defined route through the campsite.  They will not deviate from that route.  That way participants will always know the approximate location and timing of the judges.  This will hopefully eliminate problems with locating the judges and assist competitors with timing their food.

Also, we are reducing the judges significantly.  We are keeping each category to five judges in total for each course.  Wherever possible we are seeking highly qualified food experts to anchor each judges panel.

Appetizer:

Five Judges

Main Course:

Five Judges

Desert:

Five Judges

 Judging Categories:

  • Presentation
  • Taste
  • Aroma
  • Creativity
  • Locally Sourced Ingredients
  • Pairing

 Local Ingredient Use:

One judge will verify this information.   This judge will go from campsite to campsite to verity your use of local ingredients.  Participants should post receipts in an easy to verify location.

Those are the changes we see making for 2016.  If you have ideas let us know.  We look forward to seeing you at the Muddy Chef Challenge and our other regional events next year!

 

HARDING LANE / OFFICIAL SPONSOR

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OUR STORY

how it all started

As sister and brother growing up in Massachusetts, we always dreamed about not only working together but also working for ourselves. In the spring of 2009, after one of us had spent a few years working in New York and the other had just graduated from college, we came up with an idea: Steve was perpetually in search for the perfect fitting baseball cap (something he could never seem to find) and one that didn’t have brand names or team logos on it. Sarah had grown up needlepointing belts and pillows for family and friends, and we thought about how cool it would be to put needlepoint stitching on a baseball hat (something we had never seen before) and to give profits back to environmental organizations.

lobster-hat

We went searching for over a year to find a manufacturer that could not only meet our high standards creatively, but also environmentally and socially. For us, knowing where, how, and by whom our products are made is paramount. Our manufacturer is FLA (Fair Labor), WRAP (Worker’s Rights) and SA8000 (Social Accountability) certified, and is known for meeting the goals of eco-friendly brands from around the world.

We give a percentage of our annual profits back to The Trustees of Reservations, a Massachusetts based organization committed to protecting nearly 27,000 acres of land in the state. For more information, please check out GIVING BACK.

Our mission is to create unique products that look great and give back.

VISIT THE WEBSITE

PRESS

“all the news that’s fit to print”

Nashville Lifestyle Weddings, Winter/Spring 2014

The Boston Globe, June 2013

Town & Country, April 2013

Nylon, September 2012

Women’s Wear Daily, July 2012

Town & Country, June/July 2012

Rhode Island Monthly, June 2012

Glamour, May 2012

Yachting Magazine, March 2012

The Boston Globe, February 9, 2012

Cape Cod Magazine, August 2011

 

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SPONSOR PROFILE / Walter Irvine, Lime Rock Park

6 Questions for Walter Irvine of Lime Rock Park

Photo:  A 12 year old Walter Irvine in his dream car.

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Photo: A slightly older Walter Irvine now owns his dream car.

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If Land Rover made an airplane would you fly in it? 

Fly, no.  I would occasionally taxi, slowly, within sight of the hangar.

Tell us about yourself, your background, and what you do at Lime Rock. 

My life began October 26, 1979 when I got my driver’s license in Warren, New Jersey.  Lime Rock Park was the second place I drove to.  Three months later Lime Rock was the first road course I raced on.  Eleven years later (after formula car training and competing in the Jim Russell Championship at Mont Tremblant in Quebec) I began instructing for the Skip Barber Racing School, at the time headquartered at LRP.  We instructed and raced at 30+ tracks around North America but Lime Rock was always the darling.  Then three years ago this August 1st, I quit the school after 24 years and began to work directly for Skip Barber- the father of the racing school and the owner of Lime Rock Park today. Officially as Director of Business and Sales.  Unofficially I help to keep Lime Rock Park strong and relevant going in to its next half century of racing and motorsports.

You are quite a car guy, and apparently the former owner of a fabulous Land Rover Freelander.  Tell us more about your collection.   

Definitely Anglo-centric and mostly 2 seat sports cars but I did successfully dabble in some performance-phobic wallet drainers, mostly “storied marques” 70’s and early 80’s vintage. The Freeloader was the moped of the cars I’d owned.  Very entertaining, incredibly capable and nicely purpose built.  Unfortunately I would have preferred clicking on The Kardashians before telling my colleagues I bought one.  It did everything immensely well except go more than 50k miles.  Some “friends” put Ford Escape badges on it before I made my first payment.

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What was your favorite memory from last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge? 

Learning off-road driving from a then-random Muddy Chef participant (Scott Brewitt) who invited me to right seat one of the afternoons.  A driver who understands and exacts the best things out of a Rover is no different than a racing driver doing the same in a race car.  They are both enthusiasts- one no better than the other.  It was a pleasure to have met and participated (as a passenger) with this gentleman, who was genuinely happy to share his expertise.

The free Harpoon beer was also an event highlight.

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Which three people (living or dead) would you like to attend the Muddy Chef with and why?

Scott Brewitt, who I just mentioned above.  In hopes that he would let me do some driving <insert canned laughter>.

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Annette, (Editors note: Ms. Annette is so strikingly beautiful we dare not publish a photo) who is my world, and a 2015 JEEP Wrangler ™ owner.

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Steve McQueen.  I always wanted to ask him why the double-clutch upshifting in “Bullitt”.  Seriously, it may sound cool but it just wear and tear. Come on Steve..

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Super tramp or Styx.  Why? 

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Definitely Boston. 

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That CD was jammed in my first Range Rover Classic (’88).  I put 131,000 miles on that truck and non-consensually listened to “Don’t Look Back” more times than Eric Yohe has consensually fawned over his Debbie Gibson collection.

 

 

Editors Note:           Like Debbie Gibson is a bad thing?  Yummy.

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SPONSOR PROFILE / Alex Josefson, President of Spectro Oils

5 Questions for Alex Josefson, President of Spectro Oils

 

Tell us about yourself, your history with the company and about Spectro.

About me? I’m an outdoorsman, I enjoy cooking (and eating), and I love anything with a motor, I am basically the embodiment of the Muddy Chef! Ha-ha.

My history with Spectro Oils is rather intertwined as it is my family’s business. It was my grandfather, Robert Wehman who started Spectro Oils in 1966 right here in Connecticut, where we have been now for almost 50 years! We have been family owned and operated since day 1, with the goal to make high performance, and quality lubricants.

It’s funny, but I never know how to respond to people who ask me how long I have been working here. I have been a full time employee for around 4 years now, but I have always been with the company in some regard. Even when it was sweeping the floors during the summers in High School to help out. It was amazing how I always got called in when there were weird odd jobs, or long time consuming ones, but it never mattered to me because I have always loved being around, and being a part of this company. My proof in that is whenever we package gear oils, every employee complains due to the smell, the additives in gear oils tend to be rather, shall we say….pungent. But to me it’s a great smell, it brings me back to when I would visit my dad, uncle, grandfather, and grandmother when I was young, to me it’s a nostalgic smell.

Most of the vehicles at The Muddy Chef Challenge use the ancient Buick designed flat-tappet V8. What’s a good Spectro oil and why?

Spectro makes a number of oils that would fit a wide variety of Land Rovers. But the ones that would best fit that Buick motor would have to be our Motor-Guard 20w50. We carry it in two forms, a straight petroleum, as well as a semi-synthetic.

 

The reason that Spectro’s Motor-Guard line is a great fit for these motors is that they are high in an additive called ZDDP, or if you prefer the long name Zinc DiakylDithioPhosphates. ZDDP is a must have in any race cars, and classic cars/trucks, especially pre-catalytic converter, or that have flat tappet motors. The most important part off ZDDP is the zinc, because it is what we call an anti-wear agent. In short zinc bonds to the metal surfaces inside of your motor, and acts as a sacrificial barrier to prevent engine wear. It helps reduce the internal damage in the motor that can lead to major repairs.

What was your favorite moment from last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge?

Do I have to pick one moment? I honestly enjoyed the MCC from the second I got to the Falls Village Inn for the pre-weekend festivities to the closing awards ceremony. The biggest thing I enjoyed about this event though is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously. It’s FUN!!! That’s what the whole adventure is about, and it shows from every aspect. From allowing contestants to bribe judges (Feel free to contact me ahead of time this year for a list of my likes, and dislikes), to the comradery, and the genuine feeling that everyone is there to have a good time, it’s an exceptional event through and through.

But when all is said and done the one thing that impressed me more than anything else at the event was how everyone helped each other out. I saw people helping to fix other Rovers that went down, people sharing spices and other supplies during the cook-off, and some who went out of their way to make sure everyone got a chance to go out on the trails and have an adventure.

I really cannot say enough about the MCC staff, the contestants, and the event itself, it was truly a special event to be a part of.

You had a unique perspective as a judge. What was it like tasting all those courses?

Divine. Filling. Hilarious. Let there be no question I was the least proper judge at the table. Other judges were using words I barely understood to describe the flavors, and textures (I’m fairly certain they made a few of them up just to mess with me). But I started to get the hang of it, and have pretty much had Food Network on every day since then to prepare myself for this year.

Now the problem is going to be stretching out my stomach before the event. I am a larger individual who has been known to eat large quantities in one sitting before, but I have never been as full as I was after the MCC3 judging. I beg all of you that are participating this year, please bring us smaller portion sizes. You put amazing food in front of me last year, and with every bite I got larger and larger. But who am I kidding, I loved every second of it!

What to you plan to display/sell/offer at this year’s event?

I plan on setting up a nice little retail operation at the track this year. I will make sure to have a number of different oils to make sure that I have exactly what you need. I will also have with me a few of our cleaning products so you can make that Rover nice and clean for the next day out on the trail!

 

I will also have a number of giveaways of hats, stickers, t-shirts, and other things of that nature.

Be prepared for awards for things like;

  • Most outlandish campsite
  • Biggest Off-road Smile
  • Weirdest food Pairing
  • Best Location/Use of a Spectro Sticker
  • 3rd Best Dressed (Behind MHP and Eric of course)

 

I would also just like to take a moment to thank everyone involved in the MCC.  I have seen only a fraction of what Eric and Kristen do to make sure the event is as fun as possible and even that fraction was immense. Along with them are a number of instructors, photographers, other sponsors, and the Lime Rock Park office, all of whom don’t get enough credit for what they do to make this happen. I am lucky that I am able to do a lot of traveling for my job, and everywhere I went I was telling people about the Muddy Chef. I can honestly say that from Daytona to Milan, from Cologne to Chicago, there are many people out there who are jealous of this event. Please make sure that while we are there to really give credit, and thanks to the people that make the Muddy Chef possible.

PROFILE / Rob Wollschlager

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

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1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

The Series 1 was first assembled with leftover aircraft parts and paint anyway, so a full on Land Rover plane isn’t that much of a stretch. Though I would hope all the gauges in the plane work, unlike any of the gauges in my series.

 2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

According to my father, Jim Wollschlager, my first words were “Injector Pump”, “Dad”, and “Money”, in that order, then followed by “Mom”. I grew up watching Camel Trophy videos, The Gods Must Be Crazy and any other Land Rover movie I could get my hands on. Land Rovers were always the passport to adventure with my family as they facilitated camping trips, off road excursions, and fostered the closest friendships I have to this day. My family and Series III 88 are back home in Mystic, CT, but currently I reside in Omaha, Nebraska with my dad’s Series IIA 109 pursuing a masters degree in Oral Biology before starting Dental School at Creighton University.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 One does not simply have a favorite Land Rover, rather there is an appropriate Land Rover for every occasion. The Series III Stage 1 V8 is ideal for highway cruises and long distance trips. Last summer it chauffeured a newlywed couple in NYC from the Waldorf Astoria to Greenwich Village.


 The Series IIA 109 is the ideal base camp/mild expedition vehicle, as it’s equipped with a winch, roof top tent, mud terrains, and plenty of room for camping stuff and friends.  My Series III 88 is the jack of all trades, it looks equally at home playing U-boat in a mud hole as it does sitting parked in front of the Ocean House. If I could keep these three rovers for the rest of my life, I will be a happy guy.

 

 

 

 4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The people. No other automotive community comes close. I look forward to rover events all year long to see old friends, make new ones, and commiserate over our wonderful taste in terrible British farm implements.

 5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The risk. Somedays the risk adds adventure and thoroughly brightens an otherwise supremely mundane day. Other days when I really need to be somewhere on time, not smelling like oil or gas, and not covered in grease, I cannot bring myself to risk taking the rover.

 6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

How much time do you have? Among the many, my favorite is still Winter Romp 2010. I was a senior in high school and drove the Series IIA 109 300 miles up to Benton, ME with my brother by ourselves. I was so excited and spent so much time in the woods that between leaving CT on Friday and returning on Sunday I only got 3 hours of sleep the whole weekend. To top it off, we made it home under our own power!

Others include Vermentation, Vermeat, and the Muddy Chef Challenge to just name a few.

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Bribery.


8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

Please bring the AA yellow NAS 90! It has to be yellow, black soft top, and Hellas across the top of the windshield. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

The 88 has a custom 4-point roll cage, winch bumper and warn 8274, 33″ BFG KM2’s, and a Detroit rear locker. It’s enough to get me in and out of a lot of trouble.

10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

1: My dad. He’s my best friend, and I HATE that he’s always right. I have spent dozens of hours struggling with a particular nuance on a rover, he’ll let me struggle, then walk up, flick his wrist and fix whatever it was in a matter of moments, and proceed to blow cigar smoke in my face and chuckle. He knows these cars better than anyone I know, though he’ll never admit it. He’s an excellent camp host, exhaust manifold chef, driver and so much more.


 2: The George. If you have to ask, you’ll meet the man, the myth, the legend, my brother, at MCC4.


3: If we brought a third, we would need a bigger rover to carry all the food, booze, and cigars. Who said camping has to be roughing it? ​

PROFILE / Bill Lucas

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

Of course. How could shoddy electronics or dissimilar metals corrosion possibly effect the safety and reliability of an aircraft?

2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

I live in West Hartford, CT with my wife Rae. I make my living flying a Dassault Falcon 50 business jet out of the Boston area.

My first off-roading experiences were with the US Army while assigned to an Air Cavalry unit, in many of their slung loaded ¼ ton M151’s. Over the years I’ve owned a Jeep, a Bronco, and a Blazer, spending most of the off road time on the beaches of RI and MA.

In 2009 we bought our ’04 Disco, totally stock. After one trip to the Winter Romp, I was hooked, and slowly started to bolt aftermarket things onto and into it.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

Just the Disco as of now, but we are considering obtaining a second one – to keep stock, clean, and running.

My favorite however would be the RHD Defender I was able to wheel at the LR Experience / West Country facility while on a trip over in the UK.

4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

Being able to go anywhere, whenever, in a New England snow storm.

And of course, other LR owners / friends. 

5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 Trouble shooting new noises, lights, leaks, and alarms.

6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

November ’11. MA’s Old Florida Road (FYI – We just added this trail to the 2015 Muddy Chef Challenge, you have been warned! LOL), with the Bay State Rover Owners group. 12 hours to finish the four or so mile course, and then the winter drive home without fwd sunroof glass and a very bent track rod.


7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

I’ve seen firsthand the competition from last year. I do not plan to beat any of them.

8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

A Disco or Defender type model that a Chevy small block could easily bolt into. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

Snorkle, HD suspension, steel bumpers/sliders, winch, aux lights, EasyPass, inline Chevy thermo mod, aft cargo conversion, new ‘old school’ Rover paint, and latest, a rebuilt ’67 Army ¼ trailer for the tent and gear.




10.  If you were on safari what three people (living or dead) would you pick to bring along?

Vladimir Putin, Sir Edmund Hillary, and Bewitched’s Dr. Bombay. Then let the campfire banter begin.

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And Kate Upton, assuming she’s off Keenan’s safari by now.

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We get a shout out on Jalopnik

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

Andrew P Collins

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are1

This is no diamond-in-the-rough. It’s not an “oldie but goodie” like Bowman’s well-storied Ram. This ravaged third-gen 4Runner a mean-muggin’ non-fucking-giving beater, and now we have the arduous task of taking care of it. Or, you know, destroying it.

Last night this lifted, bent, ratty Toyota 4Runner appeared at my doorstep like an abandoned baby in a basket. It smells faintly of Mexican food and everything aft of the front seats seem to have been converted to a sleeping/storage area.

At least somebody did put the wheel back where it’s meant to go, here’s the 4Runner as it sits at Truck Yeah HQ right now:

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are234

The whole thing is this cool militaryish green/grey with a Rhinoliner’d hood (why?). The front grille is definitely not straight and neither is the (aftermarket?) trailer-hitch rig. But really, all it needs is a light bar and maybe some funky Plasti-Dip on those wheels. Next stop Wal-Mart, baby.

Okay the real story is the owner (a former colleague) lit off to San Francisco and didn’t feel like paying for parking, I think, so he bequeathed it to Truck Yeah!/Jalopnik for an undefined period of time “as long as we promised to document its destruction.”

I dunno, the whole arrangement’s pretty vague but I’m basically running a rusty orphanage up here and I just couldn’t turn those sweet three-spoke wheels away.

After a brief assessment and lap around the driveway, I’ve concluded it may be too nice to simply suicide… sounds okay, tires are great, and the 3″(?) lift looks professionally executed.

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

So what are we going to do with this hog? Chase polar bears up Canada way? Mud racin’? Make it my new guest bedroom? Should be a good rig to teach my fellow NY-based bloggers how to off-road this summer… at the very least.

Your turn: Ideas. Go.


Andrew P. Collins is Jalopnik’s off-road and adventure guy. Shoot him an email atandrew@jalopnik.com or hit him up on Twitter @andr3wcollins to talk trucks.

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You should come to Rovers on the Rocks this year, or Muddy Chef challenge up at Lime Rock if you want something more local to you.

Hillrock Estate Distillery in Whisky Advocate

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Hillrock Estate Distillery: tiny, vertical, and beautiful

July 2nd, 2012

Whisky Advocate’s managing editor and contributor Lew Bryson reports on his visit to Hillrock Estate Distillery.

I recently took a trip up to Hillrock Estate Distillery, near Ancram, New York. The distillery is east of the Hudson River, near the Massachusetts border, in a rolling, wooded valley near the Berkshires, an area that was settled by Dutch grain planters. This is a part of the country I’m well familiar with; my wife grew up here, and we were married about fifteen miles away. So I wasn’t surprised to find that the roads to Hillrock were narrow and winding, or that the place itself was beautifully rural.

Hillrock is the baby of Jeffrey Baker, who made his money in banking…but has a farming background. He’s been involved in small-scale farming as a sideline for over 20 years, having started with a dairy farm in 1989, then organic beef, finally moving down from the Vermont border to Ancram, where he became interested in the concept of field-to-glass distilling. He was particularly interested in the idea of tasting a difference from grain grown in one field vs. another, and eventually hooked up with well-known distilling expert Dave Pickerell.

Dave’s spent quite a bit of time here in the past year, and was there when I arrived at Baker’s 1806 farmhouse. They were in a mood to celebrate: they had just that very minute received an approval email from ATTTB for their solera bourbon label. We went out on the porch, looked down on the distillery, sitting in a sunny spot between a barley field and a rye field, and talked.

Hillrock’s all about details. The rye and barley is grown here and on another 100 or so acres in the valley (the corn is grown by local farmers); it’s being grown organically, but they haven’t received their certification yet. They built a malthouse with floor maltings, what they believe to be the first such in-house distillery maltings in the country since Repeal. They’re using a variety of smoking techniques for some of the malt (and looking at old maps to find local peat sources). They are distilling on a combi-still (a pot still with a column) with a series of adjustments applicable to the type of spirit produced that Pickerell would take pains to show me (distillation began in October, 2011). They are currently aging spirit in seven different barrel sizes.

It was the seven different barrel sizes that led Pickerell to laugh and admit, “Sometimes I do things that are a pain in the ass.” His day-to-day distiller (and maltster, and warehouse manager, and bottler…), Tim Welly, grinned in tacit agreement.

That in turn led Baker to admit that he went along with all of it, and instigated some of it. That’s why he’s the sole investor. “I’m a detail-oriented guy,” he explained. “If you’re going to do this, something this insane…do you really want an investor looking over your shoulder?”

We did sit down and taste the solera bourbon, which includes aged stock they bought and mingled with small-barrel aged Hillrock distillate. It is a good whiskey, with a cinnamon-spicy, fruit-laced finish. Dave recalled his excitement when that spicy note appeared. “That’s from that field,” he said. It was proof of the terroir concept, when they knew they had something with the estate-grown grain concept.

The solera bourbon will be available in New York around the beginning of October, as will a single malt whisky that is about to begin a wood finishing process. Dave was a bit cagey about that, only saying that he’d done research and found a dynamite wood to season whiskey; further pressure would only get that it was a type of fruit tree. Or maybe a nut tree. And he wouldn’t tell me more.

The tasting room is more like a small vineyard than most small distillery’s, with graceful wood furniture and samples of locally-grown foods. The whole place is simply elegant, and will make a great tour once it’s open.

There’s not going to be a lot of whiskey out of Hillrock, but I suspect we’ll be seeing more of them, and more of this type of high-end distillery; like Distillery No. 209, a high-end gin distillery in San Francisco that I visited last fall. This is going to be part of the future of whiskey distilling, a small and very interesting part.

From: http://whiskyadvocate.com/whisky/2012/07/02/hillrock-estate-distillery-tiny-vertical-and-beautiful/

RESEARCH IN RECOVERY / OFFICIAL SPONSOR

 

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Our Vision

We are simple people here at RIR and when starting this venture we set out to do one thing.

Design and build the highest quality recovery products for synthetic winch line applications.

Design Criteria

These are what we have in mind when we design our components.
  • Safe
  • Strong
  • Tough
  • Lightweight
  • Compact
  • Soft shackle friendly
  • Last but not least COOL!

About Us

Research in Recovery LLC is a small company in Upstate New York. Our focus is to build the highest quality Recovery Gear possible. All of our gear is designed in USA and made in USA. We believe in supporting our local community so we strive to utilize local craftsmen for our production.

To purchase any of the products on this page please visit:  http://www.researchinrecoveryllc.net/

Recovery Blok

Recovery Blok

CNC machined 6061 Billet Aluminum body with a tumble finish,

300 series stainless steel axle and 4.5″ diameter polymer pulley.

Winch line capacity is 1/4″-1/2″diameter.

Working load limit is 18,000lbs.

NOT RATED FOR LIFTING!

$270.00

 Line Lok

Line Lok

Using a winch line thimble allows the winch operator to keep a safer distance to the fairlead when spooling in winch line.

2 piece dovetail design CNC machined from 6061 billet aluminum with a tumble finish.

.875″ diameter 17-4PH stainless steel pin.

Working load limit is 18,000lbs.

Breaking strength is 38,000lbs.

NOT RATED FOR LIFTING!

There is no need to cut or splice your line when using the Line Lok thimble. Just remove your existing hook and install the Line Lok in its place.

This product accepts up to 3/8″ diameter winch line and it accepts a 3/4″ D shackle or Soft Shackles.

**DOES NOT ACCEPT  D SHACKLES OTHER THAN 3/4″**

$120.00

The “Huxley”

The "Huxley"

This is our heavy duty version of a hawse style fairlead.

It’s a massive 1.5″ thick X 2.5″ tall it has a 10″ bolt pattern.

CNC machined from 6061 billet aluminum with a tumble finish.

We have also added the TEB feature(Trails End Beverage) a bottle opener machined into the bottom of the fairlead.

$85.00

RIR LLC LOGO DECAL

RIR LLC LOGO DECAL

4″ X 4″ DECAL

$5.00

researchinrecoveryllc@gmail.com

16 Allen St Hudson Falls NY 12839

http://www.researchinrecoveryllc.net/

Aerial View of The Muddy Chef Challenge @ Crown Maple Estate

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BraeVal / OFFICIAL SPONSOR

 

 

Braeval Sporting Apparel LLC

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BraeVal is a Scottish word for the Upland River Valleys that exist between the mountains and rugged brae of the Scottish highlands, where streams and rivers tumble to loch and sea. It is pronounced ‘brave-all’. It is a land of arduous challenges in a place where sporting adventure is welcomed as part of a very robust lifestyle. The name was chosen because it symbolizes the special sense of outdoor adventure that excites all sportsmen. At BraeVal, we believe that this imagery holds the heart of every sporting adventurer who ever hiked beyond the view of town. This also captures the elegant mystique that we believe we can fulfill through the BraeVal line of fine sporting apparel.

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The most comfortable apparel in the world.

For the upscale sporting connoisseur who equates the good life with outdoor travel and sporting adventure, the Braeval brand name represents the best combination of quality, luxury, and ruggedness – the apex of the sporting adventure category of men’s apparel. BraeVal’s goal is to make the most comfortable apparel in the world. BrãeVal clothing is not so much designed as it is engineered. Infused with the style and finish of European men’s sporting fashion, garments are also built for lasting comfort. We’ve constructed each garment paying particular attention to reinforcing the stress areas resulting in the BraeVal Difference featuring: double layer pockets; triple-stitched and serged seams; box stitching; extra-full cut and long tails to name a few. And, we’ve identified other details that make our garments infinitely wearable: the hidden vented bi-swing back on shirts, and cape-vent back on sweaters; zip-vent sleeves on shirts, zip-off sleeves on sweaters; and below waist zippered security pockets on our shirts combine to make garments equally suited to town, social and casual business or country for outdoor sporting activities such as fishing, hunting, hiking, falconry, adventure travel, and outdoor photography.

 

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Contact

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BraeVal Sporting Apparel, LLC

503 Bantam Road
Litchfield, CT 06759 USA

Gregor McCluskey
Office: 860-482-7260
Cell: 860-539-9696
gregor@braeval.net

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