PROFILE / Rob Wollschlager

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

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1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

The Series 1 was first assembled with leftover aircraft parts and paint anyway, so a full on Land Rover plane isn’t that much of a stretch. Though I would hope all the gauges in the plane work, unlike any of the gauges in my series.

 2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

According to my father, Jim Wollschlager, my first words were “Injector Pump”, “Dad”, and “Money”, in that order, then followed by “Mom”. I grew up watching Camel Trophy videos, The Gods Must Be Crazy and any other Land Rover movie I could get my hands on. Land Rovers were always the passport to adventure with my family as they facilitated camping trips, off road excursions, and fostered the closest friendships I have to this day. My family and Series III 88 are back home in Mystic, CT, but currently I reside in Omaha, Nebraska with my dad’s Series IIA 109 pursuing a masters degree in Oral Biology before starting Dental School at Creighton University.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 One does not simply have a favorite Land Rover, rather there is an appropriate Land Rover for every occasion. The Series III Stage 1 V8 is ideal for highway cruises and long distance trips. Last summer it chauffeured a newlywed couple in NYC from the Waldorf Astoria to Greenwich Village.


 The Series IIA 109 is the ideal base camp/mild expedition vehicle, as it’s equipped with a winch, roof top tent, mud terrains, and plenty of room for camping stuff and friends.  My Series III 88 is the jack of all trades, it looks equally at home playing U-boat in a mud hole as it does sitting parked in front of the Ocean House. If I could keep these three rovers for the rest of my life, I will be a happy guy.

 

 

 

 4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The people. No other automotive community comes close. I look forward to rover events all year long to see old friends, make new ones, and commiserate over our wonderful taste in terrible British farm implements.

 5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The risk. Somedays the risk adds adventure and thoroughly brightens an otherwise supremely mundane day. Other days when I really need to be somewhere on time, not smelling like oil or gas, and not covered in grease, I cannot bring myself to risk taking the rover.

 6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

How much time do you have? Among the many, my favorite is still Winter Romp 2010. I was a senior in high school and drove the Series IIA 109 300 miles up to Benton, ME with my brother by ourselves. I was so excited and spent so much time in the woods that between leaving CT on Friday and returning on Sunday I only got 3 hours of sleep the whole weekend. To top it off, we made it home under our own power!

Others include Vermentation, Vermeat, and the Muddy Chef Challenge to just name a few.

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Bribery.


8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

Please bring the AA yellow NAS 90! It has to be yellow, black soft top, and Hellas across the top of the windshield. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

The 88 has a custom 4-point roll cage, winch bumper and warn 8274, 33″ BFG KM2’s, and a Detroit rear locker. It’s enough to get me in and out of a lot of trouble.

10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

1: My dad. He’s my best friend, and I HATE that he’s always right. I have spent dozens of hours struggling with a particular nuance on a rover, he’ll let me struggle, then walk up, flick his wrist and fix whatever it was in a matter of moments, and proceed to blow cigar smoke in my face and chuckle. He knows these cars better than anyone I know, though he’ll never admit it. He’s an excellent camp host, exhaust manifold chef, driver and so much more.


 2: The George. If you have to ask, you’ll meet the man, the myth, the legend, my brother, at MCC4.


3: If we brought a third, we would need a bigger rover to carry all the food, booze, and cigars. Who said camping has to be roughing it? ​

Hillrock Estate Distillery in Whisky Advocate

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Hillrock Estate Distillery: tiny, vertical, and beautiful

July 2nd, 2012

Whisky Advocate’s managing editor and contributor Lew Bryson reports on his visit to Hillrock Estate Distillery.

I recently took a trip up to Hillrock Estate Distillery, near Ancram, New York. The distillery is east of the Hudson River, near the Massachusetts border, in a rolling, wooded valley near the Berkshires, an area that was settled by Dutch grain planters. This is a part of the country I’m well familiar with; my wife grew up here, and we were married about fifteen miles away. So I wasn’t surprised to find that the roads to Hillrock were narrow and winding, or that the place itself was beautifully rural.

Hillrock is the baby of Jeffrey Baker, who made his money in banking…but has a farming background. He’s been involved in small-scale farming as a sideline for over 20 years, having started with a dairy farm in 1989, then organic beef, finally moving down from the Vermont border to Ancram, where he became interested in the concept of field-to-glass distilling. He was particularly interested in the idea of tasting a difference from grain grown in one field vs. another, and eventually hooked up with well-known distilling expert Dave Pickerell.

Dave’s spent quite a bit of time here in the past year, and was there when I arrived at Baker’s 1806 farmhouse. They were in a mood to celebrate: they had just that very minute received an approval email from ATTTB for their solera bourbon label. We went out on the porch, looked down on the distillery, sitting in a sunny spot between a barley field and a rye field, and talked.

Hillrock’s all about details. The rye and barley is grown here and on another 100 or so acres in the valley (the corn is grown by local farmers); it’s being grown organically, but they haven’t received their certification yet. They built a malthouse with floor maltings, what they believe to be the first such in-house distillery maltings in the country since Repeal. They’re using a variety of smoking techniques for some of the malt (and looking at old maps to find local peat sources). They are distilling on a combi-still (a pot still with a column) with a series of adjustments applicable to the type of spirit produced that Pickerell would take pains to show me (distillation began in October, 2011). They are currently aging spirit in seven different barrel sizes.

It was the seven different barrel sizes that led Pickerell to laugh and admit, “Sometimes I do things that are a pain in the ass.” His day-to-day distiller (and maltster, and warehouse manager, and bottler…), Tim Welly, grinned in tacit agreement.

That in turn led Baker to admit that he went along with all of it, and instigated some of it. That’s why he’s the sole investor. “I’m a detail-oriented guy,” he explained. “If you’re going to do this, something this insane…do you really want an investor looking over your shoulder?”

We did sit down and taste the solera bourbon, which includes aged stock they bought and mingled with small-barrel aged Hillrock distillate. It is a good whiskey, with a cinnamon-spicy, fruit-laced finish. Dave recalled his excitement when that spicy note appeared. “That’s from that field,” he said. It was proof of the terroir concept, when they knew they had something with the estate-grown grain concept.

The solera bourbon will be available in New York around the beginning of October, as will a single malt whisky that is about to begin a wood finishing process. Dave was a bit cagey about that, only saying that he’d done research and found a dynamite wood to season whiskey; further pressure would only get that it was a type of fruit tree. Or maybe a nut tree. And he wouldn’t tell me more.

The tasting room is more like a small vineyard than most small distillery’s, with graceful wood furniture and samples of locally-grown foods. The whole place is simply elegant, and will make a great tour once it’s open.

There’s not going to be a lot of whiskey out of Hillrock, but I suspect we’ll be seeing more of them, and more of this type of high-end distillery; like Distillery No. 209, a high-end gin distillery in San Francisco that I visited last fall. This is going to be part of the future of whiskey distilling, a small and very interesting part.

From: http://whiskyadvocate.com/whisky/2012/07/02/hillrock-estate-distillery-tiny-vertical-and-beautiful/

hey event listing / 2015 MCC4

Muddy Chef Challenge 4

Muddy Chef Challenge 4

The date has been selected! July 30 – Aug 2, 2015. We are excited to continue our relationship with Lime Rock Park as event host. Also, since last year several million dollars has been invested there in infrastructure and grounds. That means all new showers and facilities! Heck, we even have a Tequila sponsor. It’s going to be great!

REGISTER HERE

New this year – pick your campsite through an interactive map. We have VIP spots in reserve also.

Please visit …

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The Falls Village Inn / OFFICIAL SPONSOR

33 Railroad Street, the
heart of Falls Village
for more than 175 years.

The Falls Village Inn is the anchor that defines the character of this little slice of paradise. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, the Falls Village District is 70 acres, the result of a “building boom” in the middle of the 19th century that came thanks to the Housatonic Railroad; it made the village one of its station stops in the early 1840s.

The Falls Village Inn itself was built more than 175 years ago. As reported by the Litchfield County Times, the Inn has “helped shape Falls Village’s history in more ways than one.” Not only are there tales of it once being home to a brothel, but a ghostly presence has been claimed over the years. Twice in its history the inn caught fire, and it was after the second one that the town decided to charter, in 1924, a volunteer fire department – and then built it right next door.

Oh, are you wondering where the “Falls” in Falls Village came from? Within walking distance of the Inn, just upstream from the steel bridge over the Housatonic River, is a stunning set of waterfalls. We hope you take some time to see the natural wonder that inspired the name of the town.

And the Falls Village Inn…

Falls Village Inn bedroom

Ravishing rooms designed by Bunny Williams.

Author of the widely acclaimed Affair with a House, Bunny Williams has been designing and decorating for clients around the world since the mid-1960s. As the New York Times has written, her designs always account for “a place to put your feet up and your drink down. It’s a lifestyle that should look and feel old-fashioned — yet manages not to.”

We are proud to have secured the talents of Ms. Williams to create your room here at the Falls Village Inn. A Bunny Williams suite is designed to be a comfortable, sophisticated background for a rich, fulfilling life.

Enjoy:

  • Beautifully Appointed Accommodations
  • King Beds with Superior Linens
  • Private Bath with Fine Shampoos and Soaps
  • Desks with proper task lighting
  • Free wireless internet
  • HD flat-screen TV with Satellite Service
  • Free Continental Breakfast

People dining

A new spacious dining room, veranda seating, and more entree choices.

Enjoy a menu that acknowledges a desire for Classic American comfort fare – think fresh caught seafood and locally grown produce – that will change seasonally. Meticulously prepared, our entrees are fairly priced and beautifully served.

Choose to dine inside or al fresco on our old-time porch. We’ve designed the eatery at Falls Village Inn to be romantically intimate yet roomy enough for large parties.

For dining reservations call 860-824-0033.

People in tap room

The Tap Room
Where the locals go

Intimate and comfortable. Draught ales, lagers and pilsners, reasonably priced. A feel that honors not only Falls Village, but also that of Lime Rock Park, our famous neighbor.

The “bar menu” at the Tap Room is what you want, and expect, from a comfortable, familiar tap room. Good portions and exceptionally flavorful. Perfect burgers. Fries that can stand alone as a meal. Sandwiches that you would make on a midnight raid to the fridge.

But we also want you to expect the unexpected: Clam chowder, chicken pot pies, crab cakes, grilled steaks and more.

We also fully expect you to peruse the walls, admiring our little tribute to nearby Lime Rock, one of the world’s finest race tracks. It has an enviable history, and the Tap Room is quickly becoming the hangout for local racers (yes, many of them legends), so we hope you enjoy our humble salutation.

When you open the door to the Tap Room, it’ll feel like coming home…

The Falls Village Inn

Address:

  • 33 Railroad Street
  • Falls Village, Connecticut 06031

Mailing Address:

  • PO Box 71
  • Falls Village, Connecticut 06031

Hours of Operation:

  • Dinner served at 5pm – Cocktails served at 4pm
  • Lunch served at noon on Saturday
  • Brunch served at 11am on Sunday

Accomodations & Reservations:

Please call 860-824-0033 or email for accommodations and reservations.

Susan Sweetapple

Susan Sweetapple

Innkeeper

TELL US YOUR STORY! / Submit your favorite story about your Land Rover (and win a prize!)

TELL-US

Our Charity – Autism Speaks

The Muddy Chef Challenge is a unique event.  Unique in that it’s completely FREE and run entirely by a dedicated VOLUNTEER staff of Land Rover lovers and enthusiasts.  This is no a “not for profit” event, it’s a ZERO profit event.  So when you consider other events that charge registration fees.  Ask yourself where does that money go?  This year we decided to go the extra step and find a charity to donate to. Classic Car Performance has donated a High Torque Land Rover (Series or V8) for a charity raffle.

We will sell raffle tickets at the event and donate 100% of the funds collected to Autism Speaks.

We figured if Wayne did it, we should too!

 

Register now – less than 30 spots left!

In this case, good things DO NOT come to those who wait.  We are rapidly running out of registration space for the event.  Remember registration is free, the event is free too.  The only thing you have to pay for is camping fees to Lime Rock park at a reasonable $30.00 per night!  Tons of prizes and free swag.  Shooting at Orvis Sandanona, beautiful Lakeville, CT location, race cars, Land Rovers, Crown Maple Syrup, what else do you want?

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