PROFILE / Rob Wollschlager

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

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1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

The Series 1 was first assembled with leftover aircraft parts and paint anyway, so a full on Land Rover plane isn’t that much of a stretch. Though I would hope all the gauges in the plane work, unlike any of the gauges in my series.

 2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

According to my father, Jim Wollschlager, my first words were “Injector Pump”, “Dad”, and “Money”, in that order, then followed by “Mom”. I grew up watching Camel Trophy videos, The Gods Must Be Crazy and any other Land Rover movie I could get my hands on. Land Rovers were always the passport to adventure with my family as they facilitated camping trips, off road excursions, and fostered the closest friendships I have to this day. My family and Series III 88 are back home in Mystic, CT, but currently I reside in Omaha, Nebraska with my dad’s Series IIA 109 pursuing a masters degree in Oral Biology before starting Dental School at Creighton University.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 One does not simply have a favorite Land Rover, rather there is an appropriate Land Rover for every occasion. The Series III Stage 1 V8 is ideal for highway cruises and long distance trips. Last summer it chauffeured a newlywed couple in NYC from the Waldorf Astoria to Greenwich Village.


 The Series IIA 109 is the ideal base camp/mild expedition vehicle, as it’s equipped with a winch, roof top tent, mud terrains, and plenty of room for camping stuff and friends.  My Series III 88 is the jack of all trades, it looks equally at home playing U-boat in a mud hole as it does sitting parked in front of the Ocean House. If I could keep these three rovers for the rest of my life, I will be a happy guy.

 

 

 

 4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The people. No other automotive community comes close. I look forward to rover events all year long to see old friends, make new ones, and commiserate over our wonderful taste in terrible British farm implements.

 5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The risk. Somedays the risk adds adventure and thoroughly brightens an otherwise supremely mundane day. Other days when I really need to be somewhere on time, not smelling like oil or gas, and not covered in grease, I cannot bring myself to risk taking the rover.

 6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

How much time do you have? Among the many, my favorite is still Winter Romp 2010. I was a senior in high school and drove the Series IIA 109 300 miles up to Benton, ME with my brother by ourselves. I was so excited and spent so much time in the woods that between leaving CT on Friday and returning on Sunday I only got 3 hours of sleep the whole weekend. To top it off, we made it home under our own power!

Others include Vermentation, Vermeat, and the Muddy Chef Challenge to just name a few.

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Bribery.


8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

Please bring the AA yellow NAS 90! It has to be yellow, black soft top, and Hellas across the top of the windshield. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

The 88 has a custom 4-point roll cage, winch bumper and warn 8274, 33″ BFG KM2’s, and a Detroit rear locker. It’s enough to get me in and out of a lot of trouble.

10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

1: My dad. He’s my best friend, and I HATE that he’s always right. I have spent dozens of hours struggling with a particular nuance on a rover, he’ll let me struggle, then walk up, flick his wrist and fix whatever it was in a matter of moments, and proceed to blow cigar smoke in my face and chuckle. He knows these cars better than anyone I know, though he’ll never admit it. He’s an excellent camp host, exhaust manifold chef, driver and so much more.


 2: The George. If you have to ask, you’ll meet the man, the myth, the legend, my brother, at MCC4.


3: If we brought a third, we would need a bigger rover to carry all the food, booze, and cigars. Who said camping has to be roughing it? ​

Land Rover Series III for sale! / Need a ride for The Muddy Chef Challenge?

REALLY A SERIES III?

A Land Rover Series III for sale?  Wow!  So you want a classic Series III Land Rover but ain’t a bank president.  Or you are a bank president and you want an immaculate Series III Land Rover…  The car below could be either.  It’s an amazing original Land Rover with a huge amount of extra parts and some extremely rare stuff.  Have you ever seen the original tool roll and the protecto-plate ID plate?   No?  Neither had I.

WHAT’S IT NEED?

Almost certainly a frame.  It’s crusty.   But, the truck drives and runs fine and has an overdrive.  That’s important for going somewhere closer than the local beach or camping trip.

 WHAT’S IT COST?

Well, that depends.  You can buy it one of two ways.  As it is and do the work yourself.  Or negotiate a new frame and have an amazing barn find truck to drive anywhere.

I’M INTERESTED!

PM me at info@muddychef.com and I’ll hook you up with the seller.  I’ll tell you in advance he ain’t looking for bargain hunters or tire kickers.

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Hillrock Estate Distillery in Whisky Advocate

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Hillrock Estate Distillery: tiny, vertical, and beautiful

July 2nd, 2012

Whisky Advocate’s managing editor and contributor Lew Bryson reports on his visit to Hillrock Estate Distillery.

I recently took a trip up to Hillrock Estate Distillery, near Ancram, New York. The distillery is east of the Hudson River, near the Massachusetts border, in a rolling, wooded valley near the Berkshires, an area that was settled by Dutch grain planters. This is a part of the country I’m well familiar with; my wife grew up here, and we were married about fifteen miles away. So I wasn’t surprised to find that the roads to Hillrock were narrow and winding, or that the place itself was beautifully rural.

Hillrock is the baby of Jeffrey Baker, who made his money in banking…but has a farming background. He’s been involved in small-scale farming as a sideline for over 20 years, having started with a dairy farm in 1989, then organic beef, finally moving down from the Vermont border to Ancram, where he became interested in the concept of field-to-glass distilling. He was particularly interested in the idea of tasting a difference from grain grown in one field vs. another, and eventually hooked up with well-known distilling expert Dave Pickerell.

Dave’s spent quite a bit of time here in the past year, and was there when I arrived at Baker’s 1806 farmhouse. They were in a mood to celebrate: they had just that very minute received an approval email from ATTTB for their solera bourbon label. We went out on the porch, looked down on the distillery, sitting in a sunny spot between a barley field and a rye field, and talked.

Hillrock’s all about details. The rye and barley is grown here and on another 100 or so acres in the valley (the corn is grown by local farmers); it’s being grown organically, but they haven’t received their certification yet. They built a malthouse with floor maltings, what they believe to be the first such in-house distillery maltings in the country since Repeal. They’re using a variety of smoking techniques for some of the malt (and looking at old maps to find local peat sources). They are distilling on a combi-still (a pot still with a column) with a series of adjustments applicable to the type of spirit produced that Pickerell would take pains to show me (distillation began in October, 2011). They are currently aging spirit in seven different barrel sizes.

It was the seven different barrel sizes that led Pickerell to laugh and admit, “Sometimes I do things that are a pain in the ass.” His day-to-day distiller (and maltster, and warehouse manager, and bottler…), Tim Welly, grinned in tacit agreement.

That in turn led Baker to admit that he went along with all of it, and instigated some of it. That’s why he’s the sole investor. “I’m a detail-oriented guy,” he explained. “If you’re going to do this, something this insane…do you really want an investor looking over your shoulder?”

We did sit down and taste the solera bourbon, which includes aged stock they bought and mingled with small-barrel aged Hillrock distillate. It is a good whiskey, with a cinnamon-spicy, fruit-laced finish. Dave recalled his excitement when that spicy note appeared. “That’s from that field,” he said. It was proof of the terroir concept, when they knew they had something with the estate-grown grain concept.

The solera bourbon will be available in New York around the beginning of October, as will a single malt whisky that is about to begin a wood finishing process. Dave was a bit cagey about that, only saying that he’d done research and found a dynamite wood to season whiskey; further pressure would only get that it was a type of fruit tree. Or maybe a nut tree. And he wouldn’t tell me more.

The tasting room is more like a small vineyard than most small distillery’s, with graceful wood furniture and samples of locally-grown foods. The whole place is simply elegant, and will make a great tour once it’s open.

There’s not going to be a lot of whiskey out of Hillrock, but I suspect we’ll be seeing more of them, and more of this type of high-end distillery; like Distillery No. 209, a high-end gin distillery in San Francisco that I visited last fall. This is going to be part of the future of whiskey distilling, a small and very interesting part.

From: http://whiskyadvocate.com/whisky/2012/07/02/hillrock-estate-distillery-tiny-vertical-and-beautiful/

RESEARCH IN RECOVERY / OFFICIAL SPONSOR

 

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Our Vision

We are simple people here at RIR and when starting this venture we set out to do one thing.

Design and build the highest quality recovery products for synthetic winch line applications.

Design Criteria

These are what we have in mind when we design our components.
  • Safe
  • Strong
  • Tough
  • Lightweight
  • Compact
  • Soft shackle friendly
  • Last but not least COOL!

About Us

Research in Recovery LLC is a small company in Upstate New York. Our focus is to build the highest quality Recovery Gear possible. All of our gear is designed in USA and made in USA. We believe in supporting our local community so we strive to utilize local craftsmen for our production.

To purchase any of the products on this page please visit:  http://www.researchinrecoveryllc.net/

Recovery Blok

Recovery Blok

CNC machined 6061 Billet Aluminum body with a tumble finish,

300 series stainless steel axle and 4.5″ diameter polymer pulley.

Winch line capacity is 1/4″-1/2″diameter.

Working load limit is 18,000lbs.

NOT RATED FOR LIFTING!

$270.00

 Line Lok

Line Lok

Using a winch line thimble allows the winch operator to keep a safer distance to the fairlead when spooling in winch line.

2 piece dovetail design CNC machined from 6061 billet aluminum with a tumble finish.

.875″ diameter 17-4PH stainless steel pin.

Working load limit is 18,000lbs.

Breaking strength is 38,000lbs.

NOT RATED FOR LIFTING!

There is no need to cut or splice your line when using the Line Lok thimble. Just remove your existing hook and install the Line Lok in its place.

This product accepts up to 3/8″ diameter winch line and it accepts a 3/4″ D shackle or Soft Shackles.

**DOES NOT ACCEPT  D SHACKLES OTHER THAN 3/4″**

$120.00

The “Huxley”

The "Huxley"

This is our heavy duty version of a hawse style fairlead.

It’s a massive 1.5″ thick X 2.5″ tall it has a 10″ bolt pattern.

CNC machined from 6061 billet aluminum with a tumble finish.

We have also added the TEB feature(Trails End Beverage) a bottle opener machined into the bottom of the fairlead.

$85.00

RIR LLC LOGO DECAL

RIR LLC LOGO DECAL

4″ X 4″ DECAL

$5.00

researchinrecoveryllc@gmail.com

16 Allen St Hudson Falls NY 12839

http://www.researchinrecoveryllc.net/

MCC3 Merchandise – Ball Cap $15.00

The perfect accessory for your Land Rover or your grilling adventures!   This washed cotton, chino cap features a cloth strap with antiqued bronze buckle and grommet. Made of 100% washed cotton; it has 6 rows of stitching on the pre-curved visor and a quilted sweatband and contrast accent on bill.  The Muddy Chef Logo and Mascot are embroidered on the front.  The back of the cap has our motto “I COOK AND LEAK OIL” and the Muddy Chef Website (www.muddychef.com). 

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With your MCC3 hat firmly in place you tell the world that you are not only rugged and adventurous, but deadly in the kitchen too.  Extremely limited stock.  Want one?  You can buy them at Lime Rock Park starting on Thursday July 31!

Want one but not going to be at the event?  e-mail info@muddychef.com and we’ll get back to you ASAP.

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Harpoon Beer Muddy Chef Challenge Event Sponsor!

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ABOUT US

Dear Friends of Harpoon,

Rich Doyle and Dan Kenary, co-founders of Harpoon BreweryWe started the Harpoon Brewery in 1986 because—like today—we loved beer and wanted more quality choices.

There was only one problem: we were beer lovers, not brewers. We knew what we wanted to drink, but we needed some help actually brewing it. So we enlisted our first brewer, took over some warehouse space on the Boston waterfront, and began introducing fresh, local craft beer to Boston drinkers. We tried to do it in a way that captured the spirit of fun that had brought us to beer in the first place. From that warehouse, surrounded by fish companies on the docks of South Boston (neighboring what is now the Seaport District), we couldn’t imagine that craft brewing would become what it has today.

We still remember our days on the other side of the bar, and have spent as much time spreading the joy of beer drinking as we have focusing on recipes, ingredients, and brewing equipment. Hopefully our sense of gratitude is reflected in both the quality of the beer and the spirit of fun and enjoyment surrounding our beer and breweries. We invite all of you to visit our Boston brewery, where it all began, and our beautiful brewery in Windsor, Vermont.

We look forward to having a beer with you soon!

Muddy Chef Hats, T-Shirts, Stickers and Safari Shirts

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MCC LOGO GEAR

We are almost ready to reveal a whole bunch of swag for the Muddy Chef Challenge!  Some will be for sale and some will be for prizes!  We are creating original design hats, t-shirts, stickers, and maybe the coolest item of all, high-tech fabric Safari style shirts with embroidered logos!

Check the “Merchandise” section of the website shortly for pricing and ordering information!