EVENT SCHEDULE

Thursday, July 26

Event Registration and Campsite Setup
11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.  

Registration opens at 11:00 a.m. for all guests.  Campsite setup and meet and greet.  Campsite registration closes at 7:00 p.m.  You must be onsite by 7:00 p.m.
 
Muddy Chef Games – Service Bay / Rat Cage
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Enjoy a challenge?  Join us for two great events.  The Rat Cage event will test your ability to handle your Land Rover and problem solve in tight confines.  Service Bay – build a simulated log bridge and navigate your vehicle over the abyss.  Minimum of three teammates required for this event. 

6:00 p.m.  – 8:00 p.m. – Vendor Village Opens – Vendor Presentations

13th Street Cocktails
8:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Join Aaron and 13th Street Cocktails for an evening of legendary refreshments. 

Quiet Hours
11:00 p.m.


Friday, July 27

Beginner Off-Road Training
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.  

Basic off-road skills and tactics.  Dorset Quarry tour after training.   
 
Guided Off-Road Tour
9:00 p.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Join Logan/Gene/Peter for a guided off-road adventure.  You will be divided into three groups.  Make sure to speak with each group leader about your preference of off-road difficulty.  Please have your vehicle ready for an afternoon of off-road adventure.  Please make sure to have your vehicle fully fueled and ready to go.  Vehicles will assemble into groups and depart promptly at 10:00 a.m. 

Un-guided Off-Road (Maps will be provided in the field guide)
10:00 a.m.

Assorted Events (Falconry, Fly Fishing, Sporting Clay, etc.)
10:00 a.m.

12:00 p.m.  – Lunch on your own

RETURN TO CAMPSITE / PREP FOR CHOPPED / FANCY DRESS COCKTAIL PARTY PREP
4:00 p.m.

Chopped at The Muddy Chef Challenge (off-site)
5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Watch skilled teams compete in Chopped at the Muddy Chef Challenge.  It’s just like the Food Network TV show – without the kitchen!  Contestants must bring everything they need to prepare, cook, and serve a gourmet meal – all from a mystery box of ingredients.  Please note – there is an additional cost to register for this event.  CLICK HERE to register.  All Chopped contestants receive custom gifts available only to Chopped competitors.   If you like a challenge this is the event for you! 

7:00 p.m.  – 8:00 p.m. – Vendor Presentations

13th Street Cocktails
8:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Join Aaron and 13th Street Cocktails for an evening of legendary refreshments. 

Quiet Hours
11:00 p.m.


Saturday, July 28

Beginner Off-Road Training
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.  

Basic off-road skills and tactics.  Anyone who took part in the Friday training will be qualified for an advanced trail run on Saturday. 
 
Guided Off-Road Tour
9:00 p.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Join Logan/Gene/Peter for a guided off-road adventure.  You need to have your vehicle ready for an afternoon of off-road adventure.  Please make sure to have your vehicle fully fueled and ready to go.  Vehicles will assemble into groups and depart promptly at 10:00 a.m. 

Un-guided Off-Road (Maps will be provided in the field guide)
10:00 a.m.

Assorted Events (Falconry, Fly Fishing, Sporting Clay, etc.)
10:00 a.m.

12:00 p.m.  – Lunch on your own

4:00 p.m.  Announcements ahead of the Muddy Chef Challenge

The Muddy Chef Challenge
5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

The MAIN EVENT!  Your team will create amazing dishes for our judges.  You need to prepare an appetizer, a main course, and a dessert.  Extra points are awarded for use of locally sourced ingredients.  Click here for a complete list of rules.

13th Street Cocktails
9:00 p.m. – whenever!

Join Aaron and 13th Street Cocktails for an evening of legendary refreshments. 


Sunday, July 29

Awards Ceremony
10:00 a.m.  

Awards and goodbyes.  

PROFILE / Rob Wollschlager

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

clip_image009.jpg

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

The Series 1 was first assembled with leftover aircraft parts and paint anyway, so a full on Land Rover plane isn’t that much of a stretch. Though I would hope all the gauges in the plane work, unlike any of the gauges in my series.

 2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

According to my father, Jim Wollschlager, my first words were “Injector Pump”, “Dad”, and “Money”, in that order, then followed by “Mom”. I grew up watching Camel Trophy videos, The Gods Must Be Crazy and any other Land Rover movie I could get my hands on. Land Rovers were always the passport to adventure with my family as they facilitated camping trips, off road excursions, and fostered the closest friendships I have to this day. My family and Series III 88 are back home in Mystic, CT, but currently I reside in Omaha, Nebraska with my dad’s Series IIA 109 pursuing a masters degree in Oral Biology before starting Dental School at Creighton University.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 One does not simply have a favorite Land Rover, rather there is an appropriate Land Rover for every occasion. The Series III Stage 1 V8 is ideal for highway cruises and long distance trips. Last summer it chauffeured a newlywed couple in NYC from the Waldorf Astoria to Greenwich Village.


 The Series IIA 109 is the ideal base camp/mild expedition vehicle, as it’s equipped with a winch, roof top tent, mud terrains, and plenty of room for camping stuff and friends.  My Series III 88 is the jack of all trades, it looks equally at home playing U-boat in a mud hole as it does sitting parked in front of the Ocean House. If I could keep these three rovers for the rest of my life, I will be a happy guy.

 

 

 

 4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The people. No other automotive community comes close. I look forward to rover events all year long to see old friends, make new ones, and commiserate over our wonderful taste in terrible British farm implements.

 5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The risk. Somedays the risk adds adventure and thoroughly brightens an otherwise supremely mundane day. Other days when I really need to be somewhere on time, not smelling like oil or gas, and not covered in grease, I cannot bring myself to risk taking the rover.

 6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

How much time do you have? Among the many, my favorite is still Winter Romp 2010. I was a senior in high school and drove the Series IIA 109 300 miles up to Benton, ME with my brother by ourselves. I was so excited and spent so much time in the woods that between leaving CT on Friday and returning on Sunday I only got 3 hours of sleep the whole weekend. To top it off, we made it home under our own power!

Others include Vermentation, Vermeat, and the Muddy Chef Challenge to just name a few.

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Bribery.


8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

Please bring the AA yellow NAS 90! It has to be yellow, black soft top, and Hellas across the top of the windshield. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

The 88 has a custom 4-point roll cage, winch bumper and warn 8274, 33″ BFG KM2’s, and a Detroit rear locker. It’s enough to get me in and out of a lot of trouble.

10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

1: My dad. He’s my best friend, and I HATE that he’s always right. I have spent dozens of hours struggling with a particular nuance on a rover, he’ll let me struggle, then walk up, flick his wrist and fix whatever it was in a matter of moments, and proceed to blow cigar smoke in my face and chuckle. He knows these cars better than anyone I know, though he’ll never admit it. He’s an excellent camp host, exhaust manifold chef, driver and so much more.


 2: The George. If you have to ask, you’ll meet the man, the myth, the legend, my brother, at MCC4.


3: If we brought a third, we would need a bigger rover to carry all the food, booze, and cigars. Who said camping has to be roughing it? ​

PROFILE / Max Simmons

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

This week we interview attorney, new father, style icon and sunroof-less Discovery owner Max Simmons.

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire


 

1. If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it? Why/Why Not?

 

I’d always trust a Land Rover to get me to the remotest location. I’d want an aircraft carrier there waiting for me in the event that it assumed the British position when I went to start it the next morning.

 

2. Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

 

Blue-eyed blond welfare baby born to a teen single-mother in small-town central Illinois. After working my way through college (and I do mean working — ask me sometime about some of those jobs!) I spent nearly a decade working for non-profits and politicians in Wisconsin till opting for law-school. I now live in New Haven with my perfect wife, Abigail, and our perfect children, Emma-Marguerite and Francesco. My eyes are still blue but the hair is gray.

 

3. How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 

My ’97 Discovery is my first. It’s perfect for me. Stepped roof, alpine windows, and super-robust frame and drivetrain echo the original safari-mobiles while the ABS, airbags, A/C and side-impact beams update it just enough (my friends say it’s perfect for me because it’s a little bit redneck and a little bit elitist). After a long region-wide search (I wanted one without sunroofs) I found it hibernating mostly rust-free in an East Haven garage. The owner bought it as a project that he never got around to starting.

 

4. What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 

Two things: (1) Seeing it waiting for me in the parking lot: It promises adventure and escape, even if only once in a while, and (2) the friendship with my mechanic.


5. What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 

The friendship with my mechanic.

 

6. Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

 

Besides the Muddy Chef? So far the adventures have been the steep learning curve in roadside repairs using bubblegum and duct tape.

 

7. How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Lock Eric Archer and Chris Copeland in the basement till August 3rd.


 


8. If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

 

An updated NAS Defender 110 (or a 130!). I’m a family guy, and I’d love to have a suitably sized Rover for hauling the whole herd into some more remote locations.

 

9.    What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

TrueTrac diffs, front diff guard, JATE rings, and . . . new headliner!


 


10. If you were on safari what three people (living or dead) would you pick to bring along?

I probably should say Selous, Stanley and Schweitzer, but more likely I’d prefer Groucho Marx, Julia Child and Ansel Adams.



PROFILE / Keenan Langlois

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

This week we are interviewing Keenan Langlois – Muddy Chef competitor, professional Chef, LR4 owner,  and the man with one of the coolest campsites at last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge.

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

Yes.  I would imagine if Land Rover made an aircraft it would be a helicopter, luxury on the inside with amazing maneuverability.

2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career, and where you live.

I am a chef at The Sinclair Kitchen in Harvard Square, and I live in Salem, MA just outside of Boston.  My family were Jeep owners since the seventies until I drove my sisters 2003 Disco a few years back.  I bought my first Land Rover in 2014.

 3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

I have had the good/bad fortune of owning my first TWO rovers in one year.  This due to a wreck that totaled my first one in February.  I soon was on the hunt for another same year and color, which I picked up four weeks ago.

keenan la3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

This year’s snowfall in the Northeast was abominable.  Loved just getting in the LR cranking it up, raise suspension and put it in drive. No shovel required!  This car also saved me a lot of pain from the wreck.  I walked away from a 60 mph head on collision.

keenan lr2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

The temperamental warning lights.  What’s going to light up next?

 

6.     Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

My only great Land Rover adventure was MCC3, had a blast and looking forward to MCC4!

 

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

I’m not looking to win anything in the chef challenge.  I just want to meet great new people and get into some serious mud.

   8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

I’ll leave the planning up to the experts.  Looks like they are going in the right direction with the Evoque and the new Disco Sport!

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

Since recommendations from new friends at  MCC3 I had added Johnson Rods and General Grabber AT 285/65/18.  Lost in the accident, but I will rebuild.

 10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

  • Bear Grylls-because who wouldn’t want a survivalist by their side?

eurp-1203-03+one-millionth-land-rover-discovery+bear-grylls

  • Gene’s Beans (Gene Schubert) to gently guide me through the rough terrain.

  • Kate Upton-because why the hell not?

GQ-Kate-Upton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join us next Monday for the next installment of “PROFILES” 

 

april-sponsor-logo

WhistlePig Rye Whiskey / The best in the world?

SOURCE: FORBES

 World Class Whiskey – From Vermont?

 Larry Olmsted

I’ve been writing on wines and spirits for over 15 years, and living in Vermont for even longer, but the two have never had much in common – until now.

Unlike vodkas made from Maple syrup or even lactose (really), WhistlePig, which is bottled on a farm in rural Shoreham, Vermont, is not just another marketing gimmick – according to many critics it is the best rye whiskey in the world.

As I reported recently with the launch of a high-end rye from boutique bourbon maker Knob Creek, super-premium rye is the hot new spirits category. America’s favorite before Prohibition, rye is again all the rage among bartenders heralding a return of classic cocktails like the Manhattan and Old Fashioned. But WhistlePig is almost too good for this, and can be appreciated on its own.

Introduced in mid-2010 and made in very limited quantity (1000 cases), the story behind WhistlePig is unique. Industry legend Dave Pickerell, the longtime Master Distiller for the renowned Maker’s Mark bourbon distillery in Kentucky, decided to devote himself to a quest for the best rye possible, the next evolution of boutique bourbons. He wandered the earth trying rye whiskies, until he found what he considered its finest expression in the form of a new Canadian version, made from nothing but rye grain (law requires the majority of starch to be rye in order to be labeled rye whiskey, just as it requires 51% corn for bourbon, but pure ryes are rare).

For various reasons, including the fact that rye grain is considerably more expensive than corn, but also because a straight rye distillation is very tough on equipment, gumming it up with sticky residue, few distillers have bothered with pure rye whiskey. But the Canadians solved the sticky problem with two solutions, using malted rye and by developing a special strain of yeast-like fungus for distillation (for much more detail on this issue, check out this article from a great site devoted entirely to Canadian whiskies).

So Pickerell teamed up with WhistlePig founder Raj Bhakta, a former contestant on The Apprentice, who purchased a two century old working farm in Shoreham and renamed it WhistlePig Farm and began growing his own rye. Bhakta purchased the incredible Canadian rye whiskey, still in bulk storage, brought it back to Vermont, hand bottled it, and it blew critics away with rave reviews. At the same time, Bhakta and Pickerell, now Master Distiller for WhistlePig, have set up their own distillery on the farm and are working towards producing their rye from start to finish going forward.

But where it is made is not nearly as important as how it tastes.

Pickerell fell in love with the stuff because of its strength, purity (100% rye grain) and maturity – he calls the combination of proof and purity 100/100 and along with 10 years of aging in new American oak barrels, claims it hits “the sweet spot” in all three categories. I think he is right, and the balance between the higher than usual strength, higher than usual purity, and lengthy aging is perfect. It certainly does not taste like 100 proof, or half alcohol, because the woodiness for the aging perfectly balances the strength. It’s got just a hint of herby spice, maybe a little mint or cinnamon, but nowhere as much as many whiskies and less spicy zing than most ryes. Rather it j tastes of grain, its essential component, in a good, earthy, bread-like way, with the caramel-rich mouth feel of well-aged whiskies. I hesitate to call it straightforward, because that makes it sound simple, but its straightforward – it tastes like rye.

I’m not the only one who likes it. When the first batch was just released in mid-2010, it immediately earned a whopping 96-point rating from Wine Enthusiast – the highest rating the prestigious magazine has ever given to a rye. The Tasting Panel magazine gave it 94, and F. Paul Pacult’s acclaimed Spirit Journal gave it the highest possible 5-star rating. Details magazine simply called it “America’s Best New Whiskey,” while the Wall Street Journal named it one of the top five whiskies of the year. There was no shortage of other accolades.

And the odd name? Well to really appreciate that, you have to listen to the funny story in first person audio from Bhakta on WhistlePig’s website, but hey, it’s as good as lots of names, and to go with it, they created a suitable logo which reminds me of the Monopoly board game guy crossed with a pig. If I’m going to buy a $70 bottle of rye from anyone, it’s as likely as not to be a cartoon high-roller pig with a top hat and cigar.

But seriously, as whiskey lovers continue to enthusiastically embrace WhistlePig, there is likely to be a lag between the sellout of the limited first batch and future production, so hesitation might not be the best strategy.

We get a shout out on Jalopnik

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

Andrew P Collins

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are1

This is no diamond-in-the-rough. It’s not an “oldie but goodie” like Bowman’s well-storied Ram. This ravaged third-gen 4Runner a mean-muggin’ non-fucking-giving beater, and now we have the arduous task of taking care of it. Or, you know, destroying it.

Last night this lifted, bent, ratty Toyota 4Runner appeared at my doorstep like an abandoned baby in a basket. It smells faintly of Mexican food and everything aft of the front seats seem to have been converted to a sleeping/storage area.

At least somebody did put the wheel back where it’s meant to go, here’s the 4Runner as it sits at Truck Yeah HQ right now:

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are234

The whole thing is this cool militaryish green/grey with a Rhinoliner’d hood (why?). The front grille is definitely not straight and neither is the (aftermarket?) trailer-hitch rig. But really, all it needs is a light bar and maybe some funky Plasti-Dip on those wheels. Next stop Wal-Mart, baby.

Okay the real story is the owner (a former colleague) lit off to San Francisco and didn’t feel like paying for parking, I think, so he bequeathed it to Truck Yeah!/Jalopnik for an undefined period of time “as long as we promised to document its destruction.”

I dunno, the whole arrangement’s pretty vague but I’m basically running a rusty orphanage up here and I just couldn’t turn those sweet three-spoke wheels away.

After a brief assessment and lap around the driveway, I’ve concluded it may be too nice to simply suicide… sounds okay, tires are great, and the 3″(?) lift looks professionally executed.

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

So what are we going to do with this hog? Chase polar bears up Canada way? Mud racin’? Make it my new guest bedroom? Should be a good rig to teach my fellow NY-based bloggers how to off-road this summer… at the very least.

Your turn: Ideas. Go.


Andrew P. Collins is Jalopnik’s off-road and adventure guy. Shoot him an email atandrew@jalopnik.com or hit him up on Twitter @andr3wcollins to talk trucks.

11 195Reply

You should come to Rovers on the Rocks this year, or Muddy Chef challenge up at Lime Rock if you want something more local to you.

Hemmings Motor News covers The Muddy Chef Challenge!

Get Your Vintage Mud On!

at 8:00 am   |   3 comments

Muddy Chef Challenge

Photo courtesy The Muddy Chef Challenge.

Owners of classic cars have more vintage race, rally and touring events to choose from than ever before these days. But what about owners of old-school, 4 x 4 off-road machines?

Fortunately, the crowd that loves to get dirty now has some options of their own.

The Muddy Chef Challenge, first contested at Vermont’s Mount Stowe in 2008, returns to Lime Rock Park in Lakeville, Connecticut for the second year in a row and its fourth iteration overall from July 30 through August 2.

The organizers of the Copperstate 1000 vintage rally—now in its 25th year—have added an off-road event, the Copperstate Overland, with its inaugural running happening from October 18-21 in Arizona.

The Muddy Chef Challenge, which is open exclusively to Land Rover owners, combines camping, off-road challenges and a cooking challenge along with sporting clays target shooting and even a chance to get dolled up for a white linen cocktail party. The cost of registration is $75, plus $25 per night to camp at Lime Rock. But participants need to bring their own food, cigars and whatever other party supplies they might need for three days of hanging out with like-minded Land Rover enthusiasts.

The Muddy Chef Challenge seems not to take itself too seriously. Making friends, sharing food and playing around getting Land Rovers muddy—the way they should be—seem to be the goals of the organizers and participants alike.

The Copperstate Overland is open to more than just Land Rover owners (though we suspect that plenty of Rover owners will be involved), but anyone wishing to enter will need an off-road vehicle from the 1979 model year or older. At $6,850, the cost of the Copperstate Overland is quite a bit steeper than the Muddy Chef Challenge, but that price includes all meals and double-occupancy lodging for the driver and co-driver/navigator, including a final night’s stay after the rally and awards dinner the final night.  A portion of every entry fee goes to benefit the Men’s Art Council of the Phoenix Art Museum.

In addition to not staying in tents for that significant entry fee, the Copperstate Overland will feature a mix of off-road and on-road rallying amid some very beautiful Arizona countryside that is a contrast to the potentially very muddy Lime Rock experience.

Different events for different tastes—and budgets, but both guaranteed to get your car dirty.

WINNING! / CHECK YOUR MAILBOX!

PC1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have registered for the Land Rover Muddy Chef Challenge be sure to check your mailbox this week for a surprise!  What better way to get psyched for the event than with a surprise.  We are working on adding additional challenges to the event.  These might include equestrian, water, mud (lots and lots of mud) and field engineering.

In The News / MCC on NELRC

land_r12

 

 

 

 

 

LINK TO THE ARTICLE HERE

MOUNTAIN KHAKIS / OFFICIAL SPONSOR