EVENT SCHEDULE

Thursday, July 27, 2017

PLEASE NOTE:  This is an estimated schedule only.  Events and activities are subject to change. 

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.     MEETING SITE: The Orvis Company Flagship Store in Manchester, Vermont.  The address is 4180 Main St, Manchester, VT 05254.  The Muddy Chef Staff will greet you at Orvis! From there you will leave for your off-road adventure and arrive at the Muddy Chef Campsite and HQ.

5:00 p.m.        Adventure Gates close. Course sweep and clearing.

5:30 p.m.        Non-Adventure registration opens at campsite.

6:00 p.m.        Vendor Village opens. Vendor presentations, tech sessions, etc.

6:30 p.m.        Arkonik presentation.

7:30 p.m.        13th Street Cocktails opens!

8:00 p.m.       Non-adventure challenge registration closes. No more admissions to the campsite until following morning.

11:00 p.m.      Quiet hours.

Friday, July 28, 2017

9:00 a.m. –  1:00 p.m.    Late registration arrivals at the Orvis Company Flagship Store in Manchester, Vermont.  The address is 4180 Main St, Manchester, VT 05254.  The Muddy Chef Staff will greet you at Orvis! From there you will leave for your off-road adventure and arrive at the Muddy Chef Campsite and HQ.

9:30 a.m.       Safety meeting in the main tent.

10:00 a.m.     Departures for off-site activities:

Off-Road

Falconry

Shooting

Fly Fishing

Outlet Shopping

10:30 a.m.     Off-Road presentations and instruction in the main tent.

11:00 a.m.      Multi-Track Activities:

Test drives in Arkonik Defenders.

Off-Road driving at campsite.

12:00 p.m.     Lunch on your own.

2:00 p.m.       Return to campsite to prepare for fancy dress cocktail party and Chopped cooking challenge.

3:00 p.m.       Depart for the offsite party and Chopped Challenge.

4:00 p.m.       Arrive at EVENT SITE – TBA

5:00 p.m.       Chopped Challenge begins.

6:00 p.m.       All meals must be turned in for judging.

6:30 p.m.       Judging complete. Trophy and prize awards.

7:00 p.m.       Return to campsite.

7:30 p.m.       Target shooting competition with Airguns of Arizona

7:30 p.m.       13th Street Cocktails opens.

11:00 p.m.     Quiet hours.

Saturday, July 29, 2017

9:30 a.m.       Safety meeting in the main tent.

10:00 a.m.    Guided off-road adventures:    

Green with Brad, Eric and Max (light off-road and overlanding)

Blue with Peter and Peter (more challenging off-roading)

Black with Chris, Gene, and Logan (challenging off-roading)

10:30 a.m.     Unguided departures:

Falconry

Bromley Mountain Adventure Center

Fly Fishing

Vermont Country Store via overland

12:00 p.m.    Lunch on your own.

4:00 p.m.      Return to the campsite.

4:30 p.m.      Judges meeting.

5:00 p.m.      Muddy Chef Challenge begins:

5:00 p.m.      Appetizer preparation.

5:30 p.m.      Appetizer judging.

6:00 p.m.      Main course preparation.

7:00 p.m.      Main course judging.

7:30 p.m.      Dessert course preparation.

8:00 p.m.      Dessert judging.

9:00 p.m.      13th Street Cocktails Celebration (Sponsored by Tito’s Handmade Vodka)

Sunday, July 30, 2017

10:00 a.m.    Muddy Chef Challenge prizes and awards. Also assorted prizes and awards.

12:00 p.m.    Campsite closes – SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!

LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF SPONSOR LIST 2017

Spectro Oil / OFFICIAL SPONSOR

About Us

Spectro brand products are manufactured and marketed by Intercontinental Lubricants Corp. of Brookfield, Connecticut. ILC is one of the world’s foremost manufacturers and packagers of quality lubricants.

ILC was founded in 1966 by Robert H. Wehman, an engineer with decades of experience in the specialized field of two-cycle automotive lubricants. He capitalized on the knowledge gained by solving fuel/oil mixture problems for Saab of America at a time when Saab marketed 2-stroke automobiles in the USA.

Wehman translated this automobile industry knowledge into oil formulations for 2-stroke motorcycles that revolutionized the performance of this class of vehicles at the time, and from that moment forward the company has set the standard for specialty lubricants in high performance automotive, motorcycle, and other “powersports” vehicle applications.

Spectro entered the small but avid motorcycle market of the 1960s at a critical time — new makes and types of machines were coming into the market from both Europe and Asia, older manufacturers were starting to struggle with survival of their aged designs — but the immediate need for a top-performing, reliable 2-stroke racing oil was never so real. Spectro’s Golden 2 Cycle filled the bill and helped many a racer cross the finish line without problems, race after race.

Spectro simultaneously developed superior 4-stroke lubricants, focusing specially on its Golden Spectro 4, a blending of fine grade petroleum with true synthetic lubricants to ensure consistent performance over a wider operating range.

Spectro’s Golden products set new performance benchmarks for most machines and riders of that time, and probably more miles were racked up by Gold Wings running Spectro than any other brand name.

Today, Spectro products span the full range of fully-synthetic, semi-synthetic and petroleum lubricants for all classes of “powersports” engine and transmission applications.

The Spectro line also includes a wide range of suspension fluids, fork oils, brake fluids, coolant, chain lubes/waxes, filter cleaners and oils, and protection/appearance products.

In addition to the Spectro-branded line, ILC offers technical assistance, specialty blending and manufacturing services, and provides customized products for motorcycle and automobile engine, transmission, and drivetrain builders and racing teams.

Spectro products are sold exclusively through certified motorcycle and powersports retailers in the United States and in many international markets. Support of our retailers is the cornerstone of Spectro’s marketing and distribution system.

In many parts of the United States and other countries, retailers obtain their Spectro products through a network of Spectro Authorized Distributors. Contact information for these distributors can be found on our website.

Products

 

SPONSOR PROFILE / Alex Josefson, President of Spectro Oils

5 Questions for Alex Josefson, President of Spectro Oils

 

Tell us about yourself, your history with the company and about Spectro.

About me? I’m an outdoorsman, I enjoy cooking (and eating), and I love anything with a motor, I am basically the embodiment of the Muddy Chef! Ha-ha.

My history with Spectro Oils is rather intertwined as it is my family’s business. It was my grandfather, Robert Wehman who started Spectro Oils in 1966 right here in Connecticut, where we have been now for almost 50 years! We have been family owned and operated since day 1, with the goal to make high performance, and quality lubricants.

It’s funny, but I never know how to respond to people who ask me how long I have been working here. I have been a full time employee for around 4 years now, but I have always been with the company in some regard. Even when it was sweeping the floors during the summers in High School to help out. It was amazing how I always got called in when there were weird odd jobs, or long time consuming ones, but it never mattered to me because I have always loved being around, and being a part of this company. My proof in that is whenever we package gear oils, every employee complains due to the smell, the additives in gear oils tend to be rather, shall we say….pungent. But to me it’s a great smell, it brings me back to when I would visit my dad, uncle, grandfather, and grandmother when I was young, to me it’s a nostalgic smell.

Most of the vehicles at The Muddy Chef Challenge use the ancient Buick designed flat-tappet V8. What’s a good Spectro oil and why?

Spectro makes a number of oils that would fit a wide variety of Land Rovers. But the ones that would best fit that Buick motor would have to be our Motor-Guard 20w50. We carry it in two forms, a straight petroleum, as well as a semi-synthetic.

 

The reason that Spectro’s Motor-Guard line is a great fit for these motors is that they are high in an additive called ZDDP, or if you prefer the long name Zinc DiakylDithioPhosphates. ZDDP is a must have in any race cars, and classic cars/trucks, especially pre-catalytic converter, or that have flat tappet motors. The most important part off ZDDP is the zinc, because it is what we call an anti-wear agent. In short zinc bonds to the metal surfaces inside of your motor, and acts as a sacrificial barrier to prevent engine wear. It helps reduce the internal damage in the motor that can lead to major repairs.

What was your favorite moment from last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge?

Do I have to pick one moment? I honestly enjoyed the MCC from the second I got to the Falls Village Inn for the pre-weekend festivities to the closing awards ceremony. The biggest thing I enjoyed about this event though is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously. It’s FUN!!! That’s what the whole adventure is about, and it shows from every aspect. From allowing contestants to bribe judges (Feel free to contact me ahead of time this year for a list of my likes, and dislikes), to the comradery, and the genuine feeling that everyone is there to have a good time, it’s an exceptional event through and through.

But when all is said and done the one thing that impressed me more than anything else at the event was how everyone helped each other out. I saw people helping to fix other Rovers that went down, people sharing spices and other supplies during the cook-off, and some who went out of their way to make sure everyone got a chance to go out on the trails and have an adventure.

I really cannot say enough about the MCC staff, the contestants, and the event itself, it was truly a special event to be a part of.

You had a unique perspective as a judge. What was it like tasting all those courses?

Divine. Filling. Hilarious. Let there be no question I was the least proper judge at the table. Other judges were using words I barely understood to describe the flavors, and textures (I’m fairly certain they made a few of them up just to mess with me). But I started to get the hang of it, and have pretty much had Food Network on every day since then to prepare myself for this year.

Now the problem is going to be stretching out my stomach before the event. I am a larger individual who has been known to eat large quantities in one sitting before, but I have never been as full as I was after the MCC3 judging. I beg all of you that are participating this year, please bring us smaller portion sizes. You put amazing food in front of me last year, and with every bite I got larger and larger. But who am I kidding, I loved every second of it!

What to you plan to display/sell/offer at this year’s event?

I plan on setting up a nice little retail operation at the track this year. I will make sure to have a number of different oils to make sure that I have exactly what you need. I will also have with me a few of our cleaning products so you can make that Rover nice and clean for the next day out on the trail!

 

I will also have a number of giveaways of hats, stickers, t-shirts, and other things of that nature.

Be prepared for awards for things like;

  • Most outlandish campsite
  • Biggest Off-road Smile
  • Weirdest food Pairing
  • Best Location/Use of a Spectro Sticker
  • 3rd Best Dressed (Behind MHP and Eric of course)

 

I would also just like to take a moment to thank everyone involved in the MCC.  I have seen only a fraction of what Eric and Kristen do to make sure the event is as fun as possible and even that fraction was immense. Along with them are a number of instructors, photographers, other sponsors, and the Lime Rock Park office, all of whom don’t get enough credit for what they do to make this happen. I am lucky that I am able to do a lot of traveling for my job, and everywhere I went I was telling people about the Muddy Chef. I can honestly say that from Daytona to Milan, from Cologne to Chicago, there are many people out there who are jealous of this event. Please make sure that while we are there to really give credit, and thanks to the people that make the Muddy Chef possible.

PROFILE / Rob Wollschlager

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

clip_image009.jpg

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

The Series 1 was first assembled with leftover aircraft parts and paint anyway, so a full on Land Rover plane isn’t that much of a stretch. Though I would hope all the gauges in the plane work, unlike any of the gauges in my series.

 2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

According to my father, Jim Wollschlager, my first words were “Injector Pump”, “Dad”, and “Money”, in that order, then followed by “Mom”. I grew up watching Camel Trophy videos, The Gods Must Be Crazy and any other Land Rover movie I could get my hands on. Land Rovers were always the passport to adventure with my family as they facilitated camping trips, off road excursions, and fostered the closest friendships I have to this day. My family and Series III 88 are back home in Mystic, CT, but currently I reside in Omaha, Nebraska with my dad’s Series IIA 109 pursuing a masters degree in Oral Biology before starting Dental School at Creighton University.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 One does not simply have a favorite Land Rover, rather there is an appropriate Land Rover for every occasion. The Series III Stage 1 V8 is ideal for highway cruises and long distance trips. Last summer it chauffeured a newlywed couple in NYC from the Waldorf Astoria to Greenwich Village.


 The Series IIA 109 is the ideal base camp/mild expedition vehicle, as it’s equipped with a winch, roof top tent, mud terrains, and plenty of room for camping stuff and friends.  My Series III 88 is the jack of all trades, it looks equally at home playing U-boat in a mud hole as it does sitting parked in front of the Ocean House. If I could keep these three rovers for the rest of my life, I will be a happy guy.

 

 

 

 4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The people. No other automotive community comes close. I look forward to rover events all year long to see old friends, make new ones, and commiserate over our wonderful taste in terrible British farm implements.

 5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 The risk. Somedays the risk adds adventure and thoroughly brightens an otherwise supremely mundane day. Other days when I really need to be somewhere on time, not smelling like oil or gas, and not covered in grease, I cannot bring myself to risk taking the rover.

 6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

How much time do you have? Among the many, my favorite is still Winter Romp 2010. I was a senior in high school and drove the Series IIA 109 300 miles up to Benton, ME with my brother by ourselves. I was so excited and spent so much time in the woods that between leaving CT on Friday and returning on Sunday I only got 3 hours of sleep the whole weekend. To top it off, we made it home under our own power!

Others include Vermentation, Vermeat, and the Muddy Chef Challenge to just name a few.

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Bribery.


8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

Please bring the AA yellow NAS 90! It has to be yellow, black soft top, and Hellas across the top of the windshield. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

The 88 has a custom 4-point roll cage, winch bumper and warn 8274, 33″ BFG KM2’s, and a Detroit rear locker. It’s enough to get me in and out of a lot of trouble.

10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

1: My dad. He’s my best friend, and I HATE that he’s always right. I have spent dozens of hours struggling with a particular nuance on a rover, he’ll let me struggle, then walk up, flick his wrist and fix whatever it was in a matter of moments, and proceed to blow cigar smoke in my face and chuckle. He knows these cars better than anyone I know, though he’ll never admit it. He’s an excellent camp host, exhaust manifold chef, driver and so much more.


 2: The George. If you have to ask, you’ll meet the man, the myth, the legend, my brother, at MCC4.


3: If we brought a third, we would need a bigger rover to carry all the food, booze, and cigars. Who said camping has to be roughing it? ​

PROFILE / Robert Nimkoff

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

 

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

Yes, but it would have to be a glider.

2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

Ex Seafood industry exec from Westport, CT currently living in Weston, CT. Punted the corp arena in 2008 to professionally pursue auto racing career and that’s how I’m depleting my retirement funds now!

3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

My 1982 Stage One SIII is the first Land Rover for me. Ever since my Uncle bought a SII back in the 70’s (named Ralph) I’ve wanted one. Still want an 88 as well.

 nink

4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

Just being different and not having a carefree easy to drive car. It’s also very utilitarian for camping and farm work.

5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

Not being able to smoke, drink and text at the same time because I’ve got to watch the road at all times!!!

6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

Since it’s a new acquisition the Muddy Chef 3 was my first foray off road. Needless to say I had an adventure at Orvis when she rolled on the side in the articulation section. See photo!!

 nikoff rollover

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

     Mario Batali is my co camper this year so I don’t need to say much more than that.

8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

Probably another gnarly basic off Series like vehicle. Jeep have taken this segment. Take it back.

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

Pretty stock. US trailer hitch.

10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

Richard Leakey,  Jim Carrey (most recently in Dumb and Dumber to),  and my son.

Richard Leakey is Kenyan politician, paleoanthropologist and conservationist.

richard-meaave

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROFILE / Max Simmons

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

This week we interview attorney, new father, style icon and sunroof-less Discovery owner Max Simmons.

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire


 

1. If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it? Why/Why Not?

 

I’d always trust a Land Rover to get me to the remotest location. I’d want an aircraft carrier there waiting for me in the event that it assumed the British position when I went to start it the next morning.

 

2. Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

 

Blue-eyed blond welfare baby born to a teen single-mother in small-town central Illinois. After working my way through college (and I do mean working — ask me sometime about some of those jobs!) I spent nearly a decade working for non-profits and politicians in Wisconsin till opting for law-school. I now live in New Haven with my perfect wife, Abigail, and our perfect children, Emma-Marguerite and Francesco. My eyes are still blue but the hair is gray.

 

3. How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

 

My ’97 Discovery is my first. It’s perfect for me. Stepped roof, alpine windows, and super-robust frame and drivetrain echo the original safari-mobiles while the ABS, airbags, A/C and side-impact beams update it just enough (my friends say it’s perfect for me because it’s a little bit redneck and a little bit elitist). After a long region-wide search (I wanted one without sunroofs) I found it hibernating mostly rust-free in an East Haven garage. The owner bought it as a project that he never got around to starting.

 

4. What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

 

Two things: (1) Seeing it waiting for me in the parking lot: It promises adventure and escape, even if only once in a while, and (2) the friendship with my mechanic.


5. What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 

The friendship with my mechanic.

 

6. Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

 

Besides the Muddy Chef? So far the adventures have been the steep learning curve in roadside repairs using bubblegum and duct tape.

 

7. How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

Lock Eric Archer and Chris Copeland in the basement till August 3rd.


 


8. If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

 

An updated NAS Defender 110 (or a 130!). I’m a family guy, and I’d love to have a suitably sized Rover for hauling the whole herd into some more remote locations.

 

9.    What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

TrueTrac diffs, front diff guard, JATE rings, and . . . new headliner!


 


10. If you were on safari what three people (living or dead) would you pick to bring along?

I probably should say Selous, Stanley and Schweitzer, but more likely I’d prefer Groucho Marx, Julia Child and Ansel Adams.



PROFILE / Keenan Langlois

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

This week we are interviewing Keenan Langlois – Muddy Chef competitor, professional Chef, LR4 owner,  and the man with one of the coolest campsites at last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge.

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

Yes.  I would imagine if Land Rover made an aircraft it would be a helicopter, luxury on the inside with amazing maneuverability.

2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career, and where you live.

I am a chef at The Sinclair Kitchen in Harvard Square, and I live in Salem, MA just outside of Boston.  My family were Jeep owners since the seventies until I drove my sisters 2003 Disco a few years back.  I bought my first Land Rover in 2014.

 3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

I have had the good/bad fortune of owning my first TWO rovers in one year.  This due to a wreck that totaled my first one in February.  I soon was on the hunt for another same year and color, which I picked up four weeks ago.

keenan la3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

This year’s snowfall in the Northeast was abominable.  Loved just getting in the LR cranking it up, raise suspension and put it in drive. No shovel required!  This car also saved me a lot of pain from the wreck.  I walked away from a 60 mph head on collision.

keenan lr2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

The temperamental warning lights.  What’s going to light up next?

 

6.     Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

My only great Land Rover adventure was MCC3, had a blast and looking forward to MCC4!

 

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

I’m not looking to win anything in the chef challenge.  I just want to meet great new people and get into some serious mud.

   8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

I’ll leave the planning up to the experts.  Looks like they are going in the right direction with the Evoque and the new Disco Sport!

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

Since recommendations from new friends at  MCC3 I had added Johnson Rods and General Grabber AT 285/65/18.  Lost in the accident, but I will rebuild.

 10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

  • Bear Grylls-because who wouldn’t want a survivalist by their side?

eurp-1203-03+one-millionth-land-rover-discovery+bear-grylls

  • Gene’s Beans (Gene Schubert) to gently guide me through the rough terrain.

  • Kate Upton-because why the hell not?

GQ-Kate-Upton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join us next Monday for the next installment of “PROFILES” 

 

april-sponsor-logo

WhistlePig Rye Whiskey / The best in the world?

SOURCE: FORBES

 World Class Whiskey – From Vermont?

 Larry Olmsted

I’ve been writing on wines and spirits for over 15 years, and living in Vermont for even longer, but the two have never had much in common – until now.

Unlike vodkas made from Maple syrup or even lactose (really), WhistlePig, which is bottled on a farm in rural Shoreham, Vermont, is not just another marketing gimmick – according to many critics it is the best rye whiskey in the world.

As I reported recently with the launch of a high-end rye from boutique bourbon maker Knob Creek, super-premium rye is the hot new spirits category. America’s favorite before Prohibition, rye is again all the rage among bartenders heralding a return of classic cocktails like the Manhattan and Old Fashioned. But WhistlePig is almost too good for this, and can be appreciated on its own.

Introduced in mid-2010 and made in very limited quantity (1000 cases), the story behind WhistlePig is unique. Industry legend Dave Pickerell, the longtime Master Distiller for the renowned Maker’s Mark bourbon distillery in Kentucky, decided to devote himself to a quest for the best rye possible, the next evolution of boutique bourbons. He wandered the earth trying rye whiskies, until he found what he considered its finest expression in the form of a new Canadian version, made from nothing but rye grain (law requires the majority of starch to be rye in order to be labeled rye whiskey, just as it requires 51% corn for bourbon, but pure ryes are rare).

For various reasons, including the fact that rye grain is considerably more expensive than corn, but also because a straight rye distillation is very tough on equipment, gumming it up with sticky residue, few distillers have bothered with pure rye whiskey. But the Canadians solved the sticky problem with two solutions, using malted rye and by developing a special strain of yeast-like fungus for distillation (for much more detail on this issue, check out this article from a great site devoted entirely to Canadian whiskies).

So Pickerell teamed up with WhistlePig founder Raj Bhakta, a former contestant on The Apprentice, who purchased a two century old working farm in Shoreham and renamed it WhistlePig Farm and began growing his own rye. Bhakta purchased the incredible Canadian rye whiskey, still in bulk storage, brought it back to Vermont, hand bottled it, and it blew critics away with rave reviews. At the same time, Bhakta and Pickerell, now Master Distiller for WhistlePig, have set up their own distillery on the farm and are working towards producing their rye from start to finish going forward.

But where it is made is not nearly as important as how it tastes.

Pickerell fell in love with the stuff because of its strength, purity (100% rye grain) and maturity – he calls the combination of proof and purity 100/100 and along with 10 years of aging in new American oak barrels, claims it hits “the sweet spot” in all three categories. I think he is right, and the balance between the higher than usual strength, higher than usual purity, and lengthy aging is perfect. It certainly does not taste like 100 proof, or half alcohol, because the woodiness for the aging perfectly balances the strength. It’s got just a hint of herby spice, maybe a little mint or cinnamon, but nowhere as much as many whiskies and less spicy zing than most ryes. Rather it j tastes of grain, its essential component, in a good, earthy, bread-like way, with the caramel-rich mouth feel of well-aged whiskies. I hesitate to call it straightforward, because that makes it sound simple, but its straightforward – it tastes like rye.

I’m not the only one who likes it. When the first batch was just released in mid-2010, it immediately earned a whopping 96-point rating from Wine Enthusiast – the highest rating the prestigious magazine has ever given to a rye. The Tasting Panel magazine gave it 94, and F. Paul Pacult’s acclaimed Spirit Journal gave it the highest possible 5-star rating. Details magazine simply called it “America’s Best New Whiskey,” while the Wall Street Journal named it one of the top five whiskies of the year. There was no shortage of other accolades.

And the odd name? Well to really appreciate that, you have to listen to the funny story in first person audio from Bhakta on WhistlePig’s website, but hey, it’s as good as lots of names, and to go with it, they created a suitable logo which reminds me of the Monopoly board game guy crossed with a pig. If I’m going to buy a $70 bottle of rye from anyone, it’s as likely as not to be a cartoon high-roller pig with a top hat and cigar.

But seriously, as whiskey lovers continue to enthusiastically embrace WhistlePig, there is likely to be a lag between the sellout of the limited first batch and future production, so hesitation might not be the best strategy.

We get a shout out on Jalopnik

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

Andrew P Collins

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are1

This is no diamond-in-the-rough. It’s not an “oldie but goodie” like Bowman’s well-storied Ram. This ravaged third-gen 4Runner a mean-muggin’ non-fucking-giving beater, and now we have the arduous task of taking care of it. Or, you know, destroying it.

Last night this lifted, bent, ratty Toyota 4Runner appeared at my doorstep like an abandoned baby in a basket. It smells faintly of Mexican food and everything aft of the front seats seem to have been converted to a sleeping/storage area.

At least somebody did put the wheel back where it’s meant to go, here’s the 4Runner as it sits at Truck Yeah HQ right now:

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are234

The whole thing is this cool militaryish green/grey with a Rhinoliner’d hood (why?). The front grille is definitely not straight and neither is the (aftermarket?) trailer-hitch rig. But really, all it needs is a light bar and maybe some funky Plasti-Dip on those wheels. Next stop Wal-Mart, baby.

Okay the real story is the owner (a former colleague) lit off to San Francisco and didn’t feel like paying for parking, I think, so he bequeathed it to Truck Yeah!/Jalopnik for an undefined period of time “as long as we promised to document its destruction.”

I dunno, the whole arrangement’s pretty vague but I’m basically running a rusty orphanage up here and I just couldn’t turn those sweet three-spoke wheels away.

After a brief assessment and lap around the driveway, I’ve concluded it may be too nice to simply suicide… sounds okay, tires are great, and the 3″(?) lift looks professionally executed.

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

So what are we going to do with this hog? Chase polar bears up Canada way? Mud racin’? Make it my new guest bedroom? Should be a good rig to teach my fellow NY-based bloggers how to off-road this summer… at the very least.

Your turn: Ideas. Go.


Andrew P. Collins is Jalopnik’s off-road and adventure guy. Shoot him an email atandrew@jalopnik.com or hit him up on Twitter @andr3wcollins to talk trucks.

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You should come to Rovers on the Rocks this year, or Muddy Chef challenge up at Lime Rock if you want something more local to you.

Land Rover Series III for sale! / Need a ride for The Muddy Chef Challenge?

REALLY A SERIES III?

A Land Rover Series III for sale?  Wow!  So you want a classic Series III Land Rover but ain’t a bank president.  Or you are a bank president and you want an immaculate Series III Land Rover…  The car below could be either.  It’s an amazing original Land Rover with a huge amount of extra parts and some extremely rare stuff.  Have you ever seen the original tool roll and the protecto-plate ID plate?   No?  Neither had I.

WHAT’S IT NEED?

Almost certainly a frame.  It’s crusty.   But, the truck drives and runs fine and has an overdrive.  That’s important for going somewhere closer than the local beach or camping trip.

 WHAT’S IT COST?

Well, that depends.  You can buy it one of two ways.  As it is and do the work yourself.  Or negotiate a new frame and have an amazing barn find truck to drive anywhere.

I’M INTERESTED!

PM me at info@muddychef.com and I’ll hook you up with the seller.  I’ll tell you in advance he ain’t looking for bargain hunters or tire kickers.

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hey event listing / 2015 MCC4

Muddy Chef Challenge 4

Muddy Chef Challenge 4

The date has been selected! July 30 – Aug 2, 2015. We are excited to continue our relationship with Lime Rock Park as event host. Also, since last year several million dollars has been invested there in infrastructure and grounds. That means all new showers and facilities! Heck, we even have a Tequila sponsor. It’s going to be great!

REGISTER HERE

New this year – pick your campsite through an interactive map. We have VIP spots in reserve also.

Please visit …

Show the whole text

Teams and Food / 2014 Muddy Chef Challenge

A whole bunch of photos from the cooking challenge.  Just CLICK the image.  Please enjoy and distribute however you like.  Please be sure to thank our sponsors by tagging, hyperlinking, and with social media.  Most of the apparent duplicate photos in the directory are HDR images.

It’s impossible to view these and not start smiling!

Eric

 

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bottom sponsor

Land Rover lovers, it’s the Muddy Chef Challenge at Lime Rock; created by Madison man

Published: Wednesday, July 23, 2014

 

 

Above, 1982 Land Rover 109 Stage 1, owned by James Wollschlager of Mystic. Photo by Eric Archer of Warwick, R.I.

LAKEVILLE >> Calling all Land Rover enthusiasts. Pack up your oriental rugs, leather chairs, Land Rover flags and signs, gourmet grub, camp grills and lots and lots of gusto and head up to Lime Rock Park for a weekend of off road adventure, fine food and drink and lots of camaraderie.

The Land Rover Muddy Chef Challenge 3 is an adventurous weekend for Land Rover drivers who want to push their vehicle to the limits in rivers, over mountains and through woods, all under supervision, of course. No wonder its founder calls it “part Great Race and Iron Chef.”Planned for July 31 through Aug. 3, Land Rovers will descend upon Lime Rock Park and spend the weekend at area venues and proving what rugged, sturdy vehicles they really are built to be.Muddy Snack from Christopher Macecsko on Vimeo.

Preregistration is required at http://muddychef.com/.

Aside from a camping fee of $35 a night, the event is free. Proceeds from a weekend raffle will benefit Autism Speaks, for more info visit http://www autismspeaks.org#sthash.iaELlP2p.dpuf.

“Land Rovers are your sort of rugged, safari, adventure-type vehicle,” says event creator Eric Yohe. As an owner of an unrestored, 1961 Land Rover Series IIA, the Madison resident is passionate about all things Land Rover and is a foodie.

Yohe arranged the first Muddy Chef in Stowe, Vermont and went on to host last year’s event in Mystic. Bringing the road race/cook-off to Lime Rock was a natural progression and embraced by the park’s Director of Business Development Walter Irvine, another Land Rover enthusiast, and former owner of a Land Rover LR2, who enjoys the “culture.”

“Off-roaders (are) very adventurous, typically very philanthropic, really up to doing crazy stuff like off-roading all day and then coming back and putting on a blazer and making a gourmet meal AT their truck,” Irvine explains.

Cooking a gourmet repast is part of the challenge. Attendees may cook whatever they can transport in their Land Rover. The dishes are then judged by an esteemed panel of fellow epicureans. No one walks away hungry and everyone has lots of fun concocting what they think is the tops in haute cuisine.

“It’s exciting and it’s nerve-wracking and you have to adapt, but it’s tons of fun,” says Madison participant Kristen Feeney.

How do fresh Nantucket bay scallops on a bed of local roasted sweet corn sound? To Yohe it sounded like a winning entry last year. Alas, other venturesome gourmands apparently served entries better tasting, better presented and better liked by the judges.

Away from the rugged terrain, attendees will put on their best cocktail attire – blazers and shorts and Lilly Pulitzer shifts – and visit two local venues.

The Falls Village Inn, complete with a taproom designed to honor the Lime Rock legacy, is “intimate and comfortable…A feel that honors not only Falls Village, but also that of Lime Rock Park, our famous neighbor,” says their website, http://www thefallsvillageinn.com/taproom.php.

Up the road in Dutchess County, New York, a long winding road will take guests to the Madava Farms where Crown Maple Syrup is tapped and refined to make a one of a kind maple syrup. While feeling like they have entered a Napa Valley winery, guests may partake in a maple syrup tasting in a finely appointed tasting room complete with a copper bar, website: http://www.crownmaple.com/visit-madava-farms.

Some of the events sound outrageous: “For those of you who want super rock crawler, smashed body panel gnarly you have access to Old Florida Road and MaBelle in Western, MA,” according tomuddychef.com. Yet Yohe stresses there is something for everyone.

“What I like about it the most is, despite the stressful things you have going in your life you really can’t think about anything else in your life except how am I going to get this vehicle and myself through these woods, over this obstacle,” Robert Wollschlager says. “It’s fantastic.”

Wollschlager, of Mystic, will join in on the fun with his dad, James. They will bring two of their four Land Rovers – a 1972 Land Rover Series 3 88 and 1982 Series 3 Stage- 1 V8 109.

Each morning there will be vehicle inspections and safety talks. The only prerequisite is that “your vehicle should be in good repair without any serious frame rust and able to handle basic off-road challenges.”

“The majority of our vehicles are the rare ones, the early ’60s ones, the ’70s … the classic Land Rovers,” Yohe says. In addition, the event draws drivers of “the Defender, which is what you see on safari…we get lots of those.”

Every morning, before venturing out there will be vehicle inspections and safety talks. The only prerequisite is that “your vehicle should be in good repair without any serious frame rust and able to handle basic off-road challenges.”

In need of a break from the rigors of off-roading, guests can head over to Orvis Sandanona Shooting Grounds in Millbrook, New York to experience sporting clays at “the oldest permitted shotgun shooting club in the country,” they boast on http://www.orvis.com/sandanona.

Back on the road, how about the Overland Challenge in the Housatonic State Forest?

“It’s sort of a high-tech Easter egg hunt,” says Yohe. “Drive to a spot with the GPS, get out and use the compass to go in the direction we tell you to go, start walking and you will find what ever it is. Somewhere in that forest is something to find like an orange flip-flop nailed to a tree.”

Whether you are an experienced off-roader or want to try it for the first time, love adventure and the thrill of the ride, or want to spend a weekend in the country learn more at Facebook/The Muddy Chef Challenge.

HEROS! / Our friends at The Great Mountain Forest

The Muddy Chef Challenge could not have happened without the fantastic support of our friends at The Great Mountain Forest.  To learn more about this fantastic organization click HERE.  To make a donation, click HERE.

STAFF

Jody Bronson

Joel E. Bronson

FOREST MANAGER

Joel (Jody) Bronson, a fourth generation land manager and forester, began working at Great Mountain Forest as a seasonal student forester in 1976 after attending Unity College’s Forest Technician program. He transferred to Keene State College as an environmental science and geography major and continued his seasonal employment at GMF. In 1978, he began his forestry career under the guidance of then forest manager Darrell F. Russ and in 1990, became forest manager upon Darrell’s retirement.

Jody oversees all phases of forestry operations including timber harvesting, wildlife habitat improvement, road building and maintenance, assisting researchers, and supervising student forestry interns, to name a few. Jody also manages the forest deer population through periodic census and oversees an annual deer hunting program. He is a member of The Society of American Foresters, Connecticut Forest and Park Association and is a Connecticut licensed forester. He is also a professional member of The Forest Guild. In 2002, he was the recipient of the Austin Cary Practicing Professional Award given by the New England Society of American Foresters. This award recognizes NESAF members who have shown exceptional achievement as practicing forest managers.

Jody and his wife Jean, GMF’s business manager and program coordinator, live in Falls Village, CT and have two daughters, Emily and Rachel. Jody’s email: jody@greatmountainforest.org

Russell Russ

Russell M. Russ

FORESTER

Russell Russ, a 1987 graduate of SUNY ESF with a bachelor’s degree in forest resources management, began his employment at Great Mountain Forest as a student forester working on the “summer crew”. After positions with the Connecticut Division of Forestry and in the landscape and building construction industries, he joined the staff of Great Mountain Forest in 2001. He holds the position of forester/weatherman and is responsible for recording and monitoring daily weather activities for GMF and the National Weather Service – a position formerly held by his father, forest manager Darrell Russ.

Assisting forest researchers, helping with on-site seminars, mapping and boundary work and timber harvests are just a few of Russell’s daily duties. He is a Connecticut licensed forester and has been a continual member of the Society of American Foresters since 1987. He has been active working with the Exotic Conifer Cooperative and as a Cooperative Weather Observer with the National Weather Service.

Russell grew up in Norfolk and now he and his wife Kim live in Colebrook, CT with their two children, Taryn and Jack. Russell’s email address is russell@greatmountainforest.org

Jean Bronson

Jean Bronson

BUSINESS MANAGER/PROGRAM COORDINATOR

Jean Bronson, a graduate of Northwestern Connecticut Community College, first worked atGMF beginning in 1984 as a cook in the Yale Forestry Camp kitchen. Through this work, she got to know many of the people who have been involved with the forest over the years.
As Business Manager, Jean handles the GMFfinances, including accounts payable and receivable, the budget and donations. She also serves as Development Director for the corporation.
As Program Coordinator, Jean develops educational programs and workshops for adults and children, recruits teachers and assists in program implementation. She also coordinates special events, receptions and field tours and manages our lecture series with local libraries. Jean maintains our website, writes our e-news and manages our Flickr photo archive. She still occasionally cooks at Yale Camp for a few of her favorite groups.

You’ll often see Jean on GMF’s cross country ski trails or walking her dog Nanook through the woods. She is married to forest manager Jody Bronson and they have 2 daughters, Emily and Rachel. Jean’s email address is jean@greatmountainforest.org.

Wesley Gomez

Wesley “Wes” Gomez

FOREST TECHNICIAN

Wes graduated from Salisbury School, then went on to Paul Smith’s college in New York and graduated in 2013. He worked as a GMF forestry intern summers during college, and now has joined the GMF staff. His duties include timber inventory and marking, forest products, and road and equipment maintenance. His knowledge of silviculture and his mechanical ability make Wes a well rounded Forest Technician. He lives in North Canaan on thirty acres of woodland that have been in his family for many generations. Wes loves the woods and anything mechanical.