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The Land Rover Muddy Chef Challenge

SPONSOR PROFILE / Crown Maple Syrup

5 Questions for Crown Maple


(This question is for Annette Cantilli – CFO, Crown Maple) Tell me about your experience as a Judge during last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge and what you are looking forward to this year

I have never eaten so much in one sitting in my entire life.  And the variety of food, the creativity, the comedy, and the pride universally displayed made for a fantastic event, one that all should experience at least once in a lifetime.

What am I looking forward to this year?  – bringing the Jeep Wrangler


(This question is for Kerri Travis – General MGR, Crown Maple) We hear you had quite a time engraving the Crown Maple Muddy Chef Trophy last year.

The engraver (a local Spirits shop) had a very difficult time with the size of the gallon as she was accustomed to engraving wine bottles and wine & champagne glasses.  Thankfully the front of the gallon was successfully engraved.  Rather than chance a mishap we have come up with another plan to add the 2014 winners ‘Two Guys and a Rover’ to the side of the gallon.


(This question is for Tyge Rugenstein – COO, Crown Maple) You have a PhD, a Masters, an MS in Applied Mathematics, and a BS in Civil Engineering.  How are you able to use those skills in a Maple Forest?


My background is in engineering and mathematics. Establishing a productive and efficient sap collection network and processing facility requires good design and technical knowledge, so my previous experiences translate well even though very different from maple production. Just as important is my experience working with soldiers during my 29-year career in the U.S. Army. The similarities between soldiers and those on the Crown Maple woods crew are many. They don’t shy away from hard work, they frequently work in inclement weather, and they must work as a team. They are key to the organization’s success.

 

Crown Maple is an amazing facility can you tell us more about it?


Construction on the Crown Maple sugarhouse began in 2011 and was completed in 2012. The facility can store approximately 50,000 gallons of raw sap and can process over 180 gallons of syrup per hour during peak production days. With 50,000 taps, the sugarhouse will make more than eighteen 55-gallon drums of maple syrup on a good day during sap season.


The reverse osmosis machine, which takes out over 80% of the water from the sap, will process nearly 9000 gallons of sap per hour. The building is capable of expansion with the capacity to accommodate 400,000 taps. In addition to the processing facility, the building is home to Crown Maple’s cafe, tasting room, retail space and corporate offices.

 

What’s the difference between “fake” and real maple syrup?

GOOD: Natural maple syrup is made by boiling the sap of maple trees in the early spring. It is commonly made from sugar maple, as well as red maple, and black maple trees. It takes 40 to 50 gallons of sap to produce one gallon of syrup.  After the maple sap is collected, it is boiled to evaporate the water until a specific temperature is reached. The resulting syrup will be two-thirds sugar and one-third water. The primary sugar is sucrose with lesser amounts of fructose and glucose. Real maple syrup is healthier than fake syrup. It contains nutritionally significant amounts of manganese and zinc, minerals that can boost immune and reproductive health, as well as potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, and riboflavin.

 


NOT SO GOOD: Imitation maple syrup, also known as fake syrup, is typically made from high fructose corn syrup with caramel food coloring, artificial flavors, cellulose gum, and food preservatives added.  Imitation syrup is mainly composed of sugars with no vitamins or minerals.


Be sure to visit the tasting room, cafe and gift shop when you visit Crown Maple during The Muddy Chef Challenge!  It’s an amazing facility!

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PROFILE / Bill Lucas

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

Of course. How could shoddy electronics or dissimilar metals corrosion possibly effect the safety and reliability of an aircraft?

2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career and where you live.

I live in West Hartford, CT with my wife Rae. I make my living flying a Dassault Falcon 50 business jet out of the Boston area.

My first off-roading experiences were with the US Army while assigned to an Air Cavalry unit, in many of their slung loaded ¼ ton M151’s. Over the years I’ve owned a Jeep, a Bronco, and a Blazer, spending most of the off road time on the beaches of RI and MA.

In 2009 we bought our ’04 Disco, totally stock. After one trip to the Winter Romp, I was hooked, and slowly started to bolt aftermarket things onto and into it.


3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

Just the Disco as of now, but we are considering obtaining a second one – to keep stock, clean, and running.

My favorite however would be the RHD Defender I was able to wheel at the LR Experience / West Country facility while on a trip over in the UK.

4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

Being able to go anywhere, whenever, in a New England snow storm.

And of course, other LR owners / friends. 

5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

 Trouble shooting new noises, lights, leaks, and alarms.

6.      Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

November ’11. MA’s Old Florida Road (FYI – We just added this trail to the 2015 Muddy Chef Challenge, you have been warned! LOL), with the Bay State Rover Owners group. 12 hours to finish the four or so mile course, and then the winter drive home without fwd sunroof glass and a very bent track rod.


7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

I’ve seen firsthand the competition from last year. I do not plan to beat any of them.

8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

A Disco or Defender type model that a Chevy small block could easily bolt into. 

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

Snorkle, HD suspension, steel bumpers/sliders, winch, aux lights, EasyPass, inline Chevy thermo mod, aft cargo conversion, new ‘old school’ Rover paint, and latest, a rebuilt ’67 Army ¼ trailer for the tent and gear.




10.  If you were on safari what three people (living or dead) would you pick to bring along?

Vladimir Putin, Sir Edmund Hillary, and Bewitched’s Dr. Bombay. Then let the campfire banter begin.

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And Kate Upton, assuming she’s off Keenan’s safari by now.

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Muddy Chef Challenge / Pre-Running the Madava Trail

The Muddy Chef (www.muddychef.com) staff and a select few volunteers recently visited Crown Maple/Madava Estate. We spent the day pre-running the trails and moving a log or two.  Lunch was served in the parking lot and everyone had a great time.  Video provided by Brad Andrews.

 

 

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Crown Maple Syrup / The New York Times

 

Photo

 Credit Rikki Snyder for The New York Time
Paul Weyant, 30, is a tree tapper for Crown Maple, based in Dover Plains, N.Y.

Q. Is producing maple syrup as simple as tapping a tree?

A. Most people think of it as hanging buckets on trees, but at Crown Maple we collect sap through an extensive tubing system in forestland owned by Madava Farms in Dutchess County. In total we have about 150 miles of plastic tubing. We tap the sugar and red maple trees in early January when it’s still freezing at night. When the temperature gets above freezing in the day, the sap starts to run and we collect it for processing in our sugarhouse.

Is the season the same every year?

This year it was quite a bit colder, so the sap season started a little later, in March instead of February, and it ran until mid-April.

How do you transport the syrup?

Around midmorning, if the sun is out, the sap flows out of the tree, through the pipes to the collection house, where it is stored in large stainless steel tanks. On a good day, each tree produces about one gallon of sap. When it comes out of the tree, it’s about 2 percent sugar and looks clear.

What happens next?

Once the sap arrives at the sugarhouse, we store it in one of our 10,000-gallon tanks. The impurities are filtered out, and a machine takes out about 80 percent of the water. The concentrated sap is then boiled and stored in stainless steel barrels until it is bottled. All of this is done in one day. It takes 50 to 80 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup.

What do you do when the tree sap isn’t flowing?

We have almost 50,000 trees on Madava Farms’ 800 acres. Last summer, we installed 12,000 taps on trees on property leased nearby, which includes running wire, pipe and tubing through the woods. And we always have repairs because squirrels, coyotes and other animals nibble the plastic lines.

What do you like about your job?

I’m constantly going up and down hills and mountains, pulling lines through the woods and using a chain saw to cut branches. I don’t need to worry about fitness because I’m doing physical labor every day.

PROFILE / Keenan Langlois

THE LAND ROVER MUDDY CHEF CHALLENGE

This week we are interviewing Keenan Langlois – Muddy Chef competitor, professional Chef, LR4 owner,  and the man with one of the coolest campsites at last year’s Muddy Chef Challenge.

Proust/Solihull Questionnaire

1.      If Land Rover made an aircraft would you fly in it?   Why/Why Not?

Yes.  I would imagine if Land Rover made an aircraft it would be a helicopter, luxury on the inside with amazing maneuverability.

2.      Tell us a little about your background, your career, and where you live.

I am a chef at The Sinclair Kitchen in Harvard Square, and I live in Salem, MA just outside of Boston.  My family were Jeep owners since the seventies until I drove my sisters 2003 Disco a few years back.  I bought my first Land Rover in 2014.

 3.      How many Land Rovers have you owned and which was your favorite?

I have had the good/bad fortune of owning my first TWO rovers in one year.  This due to a wreck that totaled my first one in February.  I soon was on the hunt for another same year and color, which I picked up four weeks ago.

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4.      What’s the best thing about owning a Land Rover?

This year’s snowfall in the Northeast was abominable.  Loved just getting in the LR cranking it up, raise suspension and put it in drive. No shovel required!  This car also saved me a lot of pain from the wreck.  I walked away from a 60 mph head on collision.

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5.      What’s the worst thing about owning a Land Rover?

The temperamental warning lights.  What’s going to light up next?

 

6.     Been on an adventure? – tell us about it

My only great Land Rover adventure was MCC3, had a blast and looking forward to MCC4!

 

7.      How do you plan to beat the competition this year at the Muddy Chef Challenge?

I’m not looking to win anything in the chef challenge.  I just want to meet great new people and get into some serious mud.

   8.      If you could ask Land Rover for a particular type of vehicle what would it be?

I’ll leave the planning up to the experts.  Looks like they are going in the right direction with the Evoque and the new Disco Sport!

9.      What upgrades/modifications does your Land Rover have?

Since recommendations from new friends at  MCC3 I had added Johnson Rods and General Grabber AT 285/65/18.  Lost in the accident, but I will rebuild.

 10.  If you were on safari which three people would you pick to bring along?

  • Bear Grylls-because who wouldn’t want a survivalist by their side?

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  • Gene’s Beans (Gene Schubert) to gently guide me through the rough terrain.

  • Kate Upton-because why the hell not?

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Join us next Monday for the next installment of “PROFILES” 

 

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We get a shout out on Jalopnik

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

Andrew P Collins

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are1

This is no diamond-in-the-rough. It’s not an “oldie but goodie” like Bowman’s well-storied Ram. This ravaged third-gen 4Runner a mean-muggin’ non-fucking-giving beater, and now we have the arduous task of taking care of it. Or, you know, destroying it.

Last night this lifted, bent, ratty Toyota 4Runner appeared at my doorstep like an abandoned baby in a basket. It smells faintly of Mexican food and everything aft of the front seats seem to have been converted to a sleeping/storage area.

At least somebody did put the wheel back where it’s meant to go, here’s the 4Runner as it sits at Truck Yeah HQ right now:

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are234

The whole thing is this cool militaryish green/grey with a Rhinoliner’d hood (why?). The front grille is definitely not straight and neither is the (aftermarket?) trailer-hitch rig. But really, all it needs is a light bar and maybe some funky Plasti-Dip on those wheels. Next stop Wal-Mart, baby.

Okay the real story is the owner (a former colleague) lit off to San Francisco and didn’t feel like paying for parking, I think, so he bequeathed it to Truck Yeah!/Jalopnik for an undefined period of time “as long as we promised to document its destruction.”

I dunno, the whole arrangement’s pretty vague but I’m basically running a rusty orphanage up here and I just couldn’t turn those sweet three-spoke wheels away.

After a brief assessment and lap around the driveway, I’ve concluded it may be too nice to simply suicide… sounds okay, tires are great, and the 3″(?) lift looks professionally executed.

We Adopted A Terrible Toyota Truck To See How Reliable They Really Are

So what are we going to do with this hog? Chase polar bears up Canada way? Mud racin’? Make it my new guest bedroom? Should be a good rig to teach my fellow NY-based bloggers how to off-road this summer… at the very least.

Your turn: Ideas. Go.


Andrew P. Collins is Jalopnik’s off-road and adventure guy. Shoot him an email atandrew@jalopnik.com or hit him up on Twitter @andr3wcollins to talk trucks.

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You should come to Rovers on the Rocks this year, or Muddy Chef challenge up at Lime Rock if you want something more local to you.

In The News / MCC on NELRC

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LINK TO THE ARTICLE HERE

KRMG TV / 2014 Land Rover Muddy Chef Event

The Land Rover Muddy Chef Challenge 3

Where

Lime Rock Park
497 Lime Rock Rd Rt 112
Lakeville, CT 06039

Upcoming

9:00 a.m. Thursday, July 31, 2014

Cost

Buy

Categories

Events,  Other

Registration for the 2014 Land Rover Muddy Chef Challenge PLEASE NOTE – IF YOU DO NOT COMPLETELY FILL OUT THE REGISTRATION FORM AND COMPLETE THE “CONTACT THE ORGANIZER” SECTION YOUR REGISTRATION WILL BE CANCELLED.  We need the info to register your vehicle and a way to contact you.  A blind e-mail is not enough information for us to process your registration.  Please provide the following information by clicking the “Contact The Organizer” button. The year and model Land Rover you will be driving. The name of your Challenge Meals (e.g. – Texas Tornado BBQ)If you would like to be located in the “family” areaIf you are bringing petsIf you have additional equipment (pop up awnings, etc)Please note, registration is limited so be sure to reserve your spot today!Be sure to visit www.muddychef.com for updates, news, challenges and more!If you have any questions please e-mail info@muddychef.com

 

hey event listing / 2015 MCC4

Muddy Chef Challenge 4

Muddy Chef Challenge 4

The date has been selected! July 30 – Aug 2, 2015. We are excited to continue our relationship with Lime Rock Park as event host. Also, since last year several million dollars has been invested there in infrastructure and grounds. That means all new showers and facilities! Heck, we even have a Tequila sponsor. It’s going to be great!

REGISTER HERE

New this year – pick your campsite through an interactive map. We have VIP spots in reserve also.

Please visit …

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Teams and Food / 2014 Muddy Chef Challenge

A whole bunch of photos from the cooking challenge.  Just CLICK the image.  Please enjoy and distribute however you like.  Please be sure to thank our sponsors by tagging, hyperlinking, and with social media.  Most of the apparent duplicate photos in the directory are HDR images.

It’s impossible to view these and not start smiling!

Eric

 

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HEROS! / Our friends at The Great Mountain Forest

The Muddy Chef Challenge could not have happened without the fantastic support of our friends at The Great Mountain Forest.  To learn more about this fantastic organization click HERE.  To make a donation, click HERE.

STAFF

Jody Bronson

Joel E. Bronson

FOREST MANAGER

Joel (Jody) Bronson, a fourth generation land manager and forester, began working at Great Mountain Forest as a seasonal student forester in 1976 after attending Unity College’s Forest Technician program. He transferred to Keene State College as an environmental science and geography major and continued his seasonal employment at GMF. In 1978, he began his forestry career under the guidance of then forest manager Darrell F. Russ and in 1990, became forest manager upon Darrell’s retirement.

Jody oversees all phases of forestry operations including timber harvesting, wildlife habitat improvement, road building and maintenance, assisting researchers, and supervising student forestry interns, to name a few. Jody also manages the forest deer population through periodic census and oversees an annual deer hunting program. He is a member of The Society of American Foresters, Connecticut Forest and Park Association and is a Connecticut licensed forester. He is also a professional member of The Forest Guild. In 2002, he was the recipient of the Austin Cary Practicing Professional Award given by the New England Society of American Foresters. This award recognizes NESAF members who have shown exceptional achievement as practicing forest managers.

Jody and his wife Jean, GMF’s business manager and program coordinator, live in Falls Village, CT and have two daughters, Emily and Rachel. Jody’s email: jody@greatmountainforest.org

Russell Russ

Russell M. Russ

FORESTER

Russell Russ, a 1987 graduate of SUNY ESF with a bachelor’s degree in forest resources management, began his employment at Great Mountain Forest as a student forester working on the “summer crew”. After positions with the Connecticut Division of Forestry and in the landscape and building construction industries, he joined the staff of Great Mountain Forest in 2001. He holds the position of forester/weatherman and is responsible for recording and monitoring daily weather activities for GMF and the National Weather Service – a position formerly held by his father, forest manager Darrell Russ.

Assisting forest researchers, helping with on-site seminars, mapping and boundary work and timber harvests are just a few of Russell’s daily duties. He is a Connecticut licensed forester and has been a continual member of the Society of American Foresters since 1987. He has been active working with the Exotic Conifer Cooperative and as a Cooperative Weather Observer with the National Weather Service.

Russell grew up in Norfolk and now he and his wife Kim live in Colebrook, CT with their two children, Taryn and Jack. Russell’s email address is russell@greatmountainforest.org

Jean Bronson

Jean Bronson

BUSINESS MANAGER/PROGRAM COORDINATOR

Jean Bronson, a graduate of Northwestern Connecticut Community College, first worked atGMF beginning in 1984 as a cook in the Yale Forestry Camp kitchen. Through this work, she got to know many of the people who have been involved with the forest over the years.
As Business Manager, Jean handles the GMFfinances, including accounts payable and receivable, the budget and donations. She also serves as Development Director for the corporation.
As Program Coordinator, Jean develops educational programs and workshops for adults and children, recruits teachers and assists in program implementation. She also coordinates special events, receptions and field tours and manages our lecture series with local libraries. Jean maintains our website, writes our e-news and manages our Flickr photo archive. She still occasionally cooks at Yale Camp for a few of her favorite groups.

You’ll often see Jean on GMF’s cross country ski trails or walking her dog Nanook through the woods. She is married to forest manager Jody Bronson and they have 2 daughters, Emily and Rachel. Jean’s email address is jean@greatmountainforest.org.

Wesley Gomez

Wesley “Wes” Gomez

FOREST TECHNICIAN

Wes graduated from Salisbury School, then went on to Paul Smith’s college in New York and graduated in 2013. He worked as a GMF forestry intern summers during college, and now has joined the GMF staff. His duties include timber inventory and marking, forest products, and road and equipment maintenance. His knowledge of silviculture and his mechanical ability make Wes a well rounded Forest Technician. He lives in North Canaan on thirty acres of woodland that have been in his family for many generations. Wes loves the woods and anything mechanical.

 

Register now – less than 30 spots left!

In this case, good things DO NOT come to those who wait.  We are rapidly running out of registration space for the event.  Remember registration is free, the event is free too.  The only thing you have to pay for is camping fees to Lime Rock park at a reasonable $30.00 per night!  Tons of prizes and free swag.  Shooting at Orvis Sandanona, beautiful Lakeville, CT location, race cars, Land Rovers, Crown Maple Syrup, what else do you want?

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